Can a women have an apple shape and still be insulin sensitive?

weight gain on the abdomen is supposed to be a sign of insulin resistance. is it a reliable sign?

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Interesting phrasing for an old subject of speculation. Above all, I believe that the process of developing insulin resistance is very complex. Mine has a “gene-level” genetic component, for instance. And there is a strong area of research now that says the insulin resistance is developing first and causing weight gain—apple shape…

I have a beloved friend who has been about as round as she is tall her whole life. Her wiry brother went T2 and died after neglecting it for years. She never has come even close in her A1c results…

I guess I would have to say that I don’t know how reliable that particular indicator is. Just too complicated…Blessings…

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There really aren’t any reliable rules with this insane disease. I’m T2 but super sensitive to both carbs and insulin. Go figure.

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how do you know you are insulin sensitive?

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By the small amounts I require to correct a high or cover a meal. My I:C ratio in the afternoon and evening is about 1:16 or thereabouts.

thanks.

Generally, yes it is an indicator. so is total weight, the heavier the more insulin resistant.

The way to get rid of it is to cut the carbs, some need to get down to 20g of carb a day

I would cut the Sugars including fruit/juice and Starches, including breads, pasta, rice, potato etc
This gives a simple overview to how it works for me. The more carbs I eat the more carbs I want. They don’t give up easy and it’s biochemical
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEayi6IBjZw&list=PLCD72F4109EDC4BD8&index=6

what to expect the first week, besides being hungry for the first 2 days, then it stops
https://www.verywell.com/getting-through-the-first-week-2242037

you may not need to go this low, but it will help

For the last 10 years, since I was diagnosed as T2, I’ve been waiting for science to recognize that the weight gain I’ve fought my entire life was a symptom, not the cause, of my T2. I have always been diabetic.

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The accepted understanding of these issues is (finally!) in flux. The suspicion is growing that diabetes and the obesity often associated with it may even be symptoms of a common cause and not necessarily in a direct cause-effect relationship to one another. It’s early days yet, stay tuned.

Just anecdata, but my mom is apple-shaped, has been her whole life, and only recently, at age 70, tested positive for"pre-diabetes" with an A1C of 6.0. However, she lost 8 pounds and her A1C has now dropped to 5.7, so I’m hopeful she can drop further weight to get into a non-diabetic range.
Also not clear is whether she’s always had a borderline A1C that is stable because her apple-shaped weight is basically stable – she’s gone up and down in weight over the years, but has never gone over her max weight that she’s been as early as junior high. I don’t think she had her A1C tested until recently :(.
I think the logic is that if you’re apple shaped, you’re storing more visceral fat that is padding and even gumming up internal organs like the liver and the pancreas, and that it may actually directly cause insulin resistance. But we just don’t know for sure how all the mechanisms interact.

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[quote=“David_dns, post:9, topic:55136, full:true”]

The accepted understanding of these issues is (finally!) in flux. The suspicion is growing that diabetes and the obesity often associated with it may even be symptoms of a common cause and not necessarily in a direct cause-effect relationship to one another. It’s early days yet, stay tuned.
[/quote]All true, and it’s motivating to have some of this “shaming” sort of perspective finally being debunked. I hope I live to see a revised view of T2 and its causes become more widespread in the general public. I’m not optimistic, not because I expect to die soon.

I will repeat, however, the parallel fact that for many overweight T2s losing weight helps. It doesn’t cure anything, but (again, for many, not all) it can make a significant difference in glucose tolerance, and easing BG management/control.

I’ve seen this directly myself from simply losing 20 lbs. My insulin sensitivity increased 25%, my cravings improved, and my DP got much more manageable.

YMMV. That’s my own personal experience. It’s not unique, however, so anyone overweight with T2, especially if you’re clinically obese, might really benefit.

Now, all that said, I know… It’s one of the most annoying things we T2’s can hear, because we hear it all the time, from everyone, far too often with JUDGEMENT attached: Lose weight.

No judgement here. As we’re discussing in this thread, it very well be your diabetes that’s making you heavy, not the other way around. Not your fault. Regardless, doesn’t change the fact that getting slimmer will likely make your diabetes easier to deal with.

There’s no question that losing weight relieves a lot of other effects, that’s established beyond doubt. It’s the cause-effect part that’s becoming more and more suspect.

I think the concept that is always lost in these discussions of weight and diabetes is that it is one and the same thing that is causing obesity and insulin resistance… Which comes first or leads to the other first is nearly irrelevant. When we constantly eat foods that require mega spikes of insulin to metabolize, we gain weight. When we constantly force mega spikes of insulin, eventually become resistant to it and diabetic.

If we, as a civilization, avoided processed carbohydrates which digest far faster than evolution prepared our bodies for, we’d have less overweight people and less diabetes and we wouldn’t even be discussing which caused which. It really is that simple in my mind.

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Agreed, Sam.

A big reason (the main reason IMO) this is such a constant issue is because of the “blame game” the public plays with diabetics. The T2 blame game is well known, but T1’s aren’t free from being wrongly criticized either. Who among us hasn’t had some know-it-all tell you you’re misbehaving because “you can’t eat that”?

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There is no doubt that the blame game is harmful and we’d be better off without it.

The bottom line though is that as a civilization we are no longer eating in a way that evolution has prepared us for and as a result some of us are getting fat, some are getting diabetes, some are getting both, and some (fewer and fewer) are just still getting lucky.

I believe it’s time to disentangle that reality from the feelings of guilt and blame, for the good of all mankind. If we stop the blame, stop the guilt, stop the denial and defensiveness, we can still start to turn the tide, not for our generation but for our children and grandchildren.

[quote=“Sam19, post:15, topic:55136, full:true”]
The bottom line though is that as a civilization we are no longer eating in a way that evolution has prepared us for and as a result some of us are getting fat, some are getting diabetes, some are getting both, and some (fewer and fewer) are just still getting lucky.
[/quote]This paragraph got me thinking about just exactly what BREAD is.

Wow.

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Our species evolved eating protein, vegetables, and a little bit of fruit when available. We didn’t start eating grain in meaningful quantities until agriculture was invented, and that was no more than 10,000 years ago. Evolution doesn’t work anywhere near that quickly. We’re not engineered to process large amounts of carbohydrate, No more complicated than that.

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The irony is evolution is also what makes us so desperate to eat that stuff.

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I think agricultural lobby, wheat and corn (and other) subsidies leading to massive overproduction, leading to them being boiled down, ground up, modified and bastardized in every way imaginable and reconstituted into literally almost every thing we eat, nutritional guidelines written by the agricultural industry etc are also culprits.

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And of course has expanded exponentially only in the last 100 years since the industrial revolution… Coinciding nicely with rates of diabetes and obesity I would venture