Can I syringe insulin out of my tslim x2 cartridge to do a manual injection.?

I am out and forgot to bring my vial etc. bg is 203 and I usually inject instead of pump for that. Especially now I am having bad highs due to terrible stress.

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I don’t see why you couldn’t. But why don’t you just tell the pump to bolus yourself? That’s what I do.

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I have done it. It works fine. But why not just bolus on your pump at this point

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Because when I go that high the pump bolus does not work as well as injection. The inset gets constant basal and the numerous boluses. Inj always works best for me for these situations. However I realized I did not have syringes either and had to pump bolus. This is an extreme stress situation, I have had days where I am at 200-250 a lot and the minute I get it back down it goes back up. Huge basal rate as well.

The pump bolus was not as good, but by not eating at all until I got home I got it down a bit. If I am remembering the right day, everything is a blur.

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That’s very interesting. I find pump blousing is more effective to bring a high under control. But I haven’t tried doing an extra injection with my own or a syringe lately.

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Yes, you can.
When Hyper is bad, or site is bad, for reasons of insulin conservation, I recapture the last ~15u of insulin when it is time to replace the tSlim cartridge. I keep that ‘saved’ insulin in regular glass vial. When I want a manual injection for hyperglycemia management, I can use that source. I have not observed any “loss of effectiveness” of that insulin. I manually inject in more than 1 spot (thigh + stomach) with the correction. I record the time of injection, to monitor IOB, since the t:Slim is NOT aware of the manual injection.
Twenty mins of stair climbing exercise and I am seeing a beautiful quick reduction in BG, riding that declining curve out of HYPER and back to InTarget within ~120mins. All good. Safe driving!

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Yes. Syringes are part of my emergency car kit, for exactly this reason, while insulin is not… Because I’m never gonna leave the property (rural homesteader, so leaving the empire is a pretty big adventure) without a full cartridge of insulin.

I would advise caution, though. I highly recommend ejecting the cartridge before you withdraw any insulin from it. There’s no need to go through the load process, just pop it out, and pop it back into place when you’ve gotten your insulin out. I have no way to prove I directly caused the malfunction, but I believe I broke the pressure sensors in my first pump by doing exactly this, withdrawing insulin while installed…

I’m one of those ones who sucks the residual insulin out of every cartridge and adds it to the new one. I used to do this while the old cartridge was installed, until I started noticing that insulin delivery was way off and there was a LOT more insulin left in the cartridge when it read empty than the expected 15-20 units. More like 60-80. There was no tech support pathway to confirm this problem, so I had to go through the CDE backdoor loophole to get a warranty replacement. (You can prove your case to one of their CDEs, who can authorize a replacement whereas tech support reps are restricted to follow their guidance.)

I’ve never seen this problem again since I started ejecting the cartridge first.

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