Challenges and opportunities for improving member experiences on TuDiabetes

I am one of the people that dropped off with the switch to the new site. First I couldn’t log on. For a very long time. Then I find the new format just awful and cumbersome, just expressing my personal opinion. I loved having my personal page and my group of friends, but all of that is gone. I enjoyed doing blogs, but that is gone. Finally, the topics don’t seem as interesting and I think because the site is difficult to use, people have gone elsewhere. For example, people with new-onset Type 1 (adults) show up on a Facebook page, not here. I do agree that the forum topics are easier to follow now. But it is rather sad to me, as I really enjoyed the old TuD.

2 Likes

@Melitta the ability to blog is not gone. You can find blogs in the Share Your Stories area in the forums.

I hope this helps you

Sarah :four_leaf_clover:

@Curlysarah, I know that we can publish blogs on the Share Your Stories, but I wonder if that’s the best way to publish TuD blogs. Is there a possibility that TuD blogs could be published under the “blogs” title at the top of the page (with home, etc.)? The “blogs” could be divided in two, one for the curated ones and one for our own bloggers.

2 Likes

@Trudy1 I stay tuned for future improvements regarding blogs, both members and curated ones. That’s all I have to say about that (channeling Forrest Gump). :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

Sarah :four_leaf_clover:

1 Like

@Pastelpainter…To finally be able to log-in, I had to completely wipe my browser history–with my sweetie’s help, on Emily’s suggestion. Since that worked, I have never logged out and really don’t want to know what will happen when I do!..

I use the @ feature, but, as I said in another thread, I dislike it as a writer. It interrupts the flow of writing and reading, making for awkward construction of a sentence, a thought, a feeling. It is annoying and yes, sometimes I ignore it and just go on…

2 Likes

That sounds hopeful, Friend Trudy!

1 Like

(I also don’t like these boxes that pop as one just did, telling me to do this that or the other thing—I can’t make any sense of them and as a child of the 60s, I don’t follow direction well, anyway) (And they are a distraction and now I don’t know what I was going to say or to whom!) Bah! I’ll take a walk and it’ll come back to me…

1 Like

Judith, I understand about the flow of writing. Would it be possible for you to write your piece, then when editing go back and put the @XXX’s in? Not sure if it would work like that, though. I try not to let this new platform upset me too much, I am still here, you, Trudy and Linda are still around, plus a host of others whose posts I enjoy reading. And there are a lot of new people coming onto the site that we can get to know too.

3 Likes

@curlysarah, I wonder if we could start a TuD blog on one of the free platforms that multiple members could add to as and when the mood overtakes them? If we could, then that could be added to the blogroll and alleviate much of he anguish some members are feeling at the loss of our blogs section.

2 Likes

There you are @Zoe. I want to say “hello and miss you” about a dozen times in case we don’t cross paths for awhile…I struggle here for similar reasons, but check in and work on participating. It used to be easier…Blessings, my friend. Truly delighted to know you are ok!

Definitely worth a try. @Pastelpainter

There–that might work, my friend. I wrote the whole first thought with a period that finishes the thought and then added the @ thingey. I could probably write a whole first paragraph or so and do that…Possible. Thanks for the idea…And yes, I’m a loyal old soul and TuD was my first online home, so I’m not leaving. I seem to be letting things build up for a few days, though I visit everyday, before I answer anything…I still find it very confusing and annoying at times, though.

1 Like

You know, this is a seemingly small thing, that I am sure our busy members appreciate, but I think sort of summarizes the less inviting features of this platform. @EmilyC

At the top of the discussion it says and is highlighted: “There are 68 replies with an estimated reading time of 10 minutes.”

Everything is measured as if it were being readied for some judge’s panel. Akin to the idiotic badges which are the main reason I only visit my page if necessitated by finding an old discussion…It is all coldly efficient and mildly offensive…

I appreciate all the work you and Sarah and Marie are doing to help us old timers find our way—even if we need to b*%&h about it along the way…

@Judith_in_Portland, I’ve been pondering these comments for a couple days, and here’s my quandry: several members have expressed the opinion that the new site to feels cold or overly analytical, but the features that feel that way to people were specifically designed to make the site more accessible and easier to navigate, which are things our members asked us to improve upon when we surveyed the community last year. My gut reaction to these comments is “you can choose not to use any of the features you don’t like, or to ignore them completely”. But I understand that the issue is really about the overall feel of the site and community, and choosing not to use a feature does not actually address that issue.

I think some of the disconnect may result from our attempt to stay modern and relevant in the ever-evolving field of online communities. “New and Improved” doesn’t always work for everyone, and leaves some folks yearning for the good old days. I also think many of us (myself included) were very accustomed to the platform that TuDiabetes was originally built on, and had long overlooked the things about that platform that were no longer working well for us.

So, while the new accessibility features are here to stay, I do think we can make an effort to “cozify” the overall feel of the site, and I think it’s a very worthy effort. I’ve shared some of the current ideas around that in the conversation Re-establishing our sense of community. Please do share more ideas in that thread! At this point solutions will be most useful, and I’m eager to hear your ideas.

Hi Judith! Good to see you too. I do miss all the regulars and people I got to know over the period of 6 years I was on TuD on a nearly every-day basis. So many wonderful, caring, supportive, open and authentic people who understand what we go through on a daily basis. I had trouble explaining to outsiders the concept that though I was never actually **glad ** to have Type 1 Diabetes I liked the feeling of being a part of a community of people who had similar struggles, triumphs, frustrations, hopes and goals. Now the only time I talk about basal (basil) is in the produce department and nobody gets my sense of humor. I guess what I got from TuD is a sense of “Type 1 pride” - it sort of made it all ok. I’m lucky that I also have my Type 1 Women’s Group which is still going strong since I started it in 2010, though now I only get to see the wonderful women in that group about once a year. Unfortunately when I come back here it now feels like returning to an old neighborhood where nothing is the same or familiar or welcoming. But I still like the neighbors! I hope you are all doing well and know that I like being thought about and I think about you all too. You are the “we” I use in conversation when I explain what it is like living with D.
:raising_hand:
Zoe

4 Likes

Welcome back! I’m sorry you feel that way @Zoe! I agree that at times the remodeled site can be visually disconcerting to me but the content is what I’m after and it’s still mostly the same. My web is tangled and as I’ve begun hanging out on FB more (both D and non-D) and also occasional Twitter excursions, which I don’t like as much but can nonetheless be fun, I still like the depth of the D-conversations here. I certainly miss having your perspective in many of the dialogues we used to have. I agree with the old neighborhood that remodeled. Right about the time I moved to Tu from the other board, we had moved from Champaign, IL to the suburb where I grew up which, in the years I’d been away had changed a lot. We’d been around, as my parents still live here, but everything was different, traffic and shopping and, I suppose, people patterns were different but we were able to become comfortable as time went on.

3 Likes

Miss you too Zoe. AR said it so well.

Thanks, AR, I’ve always very much enjoyed your posts as well!

To play on your metaphor: I’m sure you had several reasons for moving to that town you grew up in, not just nostalgia so adjusting to the changes was worth it for you. I had the opposite experience of moving back to a town I’d lived in (in your neck of the woods, actually, Madison, Wisconsin) where I’d had an amazing time of connections and specialness - it was 1966 need I say more? When I went back, as it was a college town nearly all my friends had moved on, the culture itself had changed and I realized in a few months that there was nothing there for me anymore but nostalgia. I agree there is still much worthwhile here, but it just seems like my time here was done and now I just think of it - and the people I met here fondly. I also feel about TuD the way I felt about some jobs I’ve had in the past: I loved the work and the people I worked with, but didn’t feel in sync with or heard by the administration. I was asked in a message if I had any suggestions to make the TuD experience a warmer one and since I’m now removed from the specifics I just suggested listening to its members and involving them in decisions and changes. I just scanned through this and the other topic of “re-connecting” or something of that nature. It does look like some good beginnings have been made in doing just that and I’m glad to see it!

1 Like

Right back at you Pastelpainter! Be well!

1 Like

I will admit there’s a few people I’m curious as to how they are doing and things like that but there have always been “drifters” or “ghosts” who have come and gone. I’m probably not here as much as, when I “outed” myself w/ D on FB, I probabaly spend more time D-kibbitizing plus straight kibbitzing there and there’s only so much screen time? I met a bunch (jeez, like a hundred?) of those people IRL at the Diabetes Unconference too so I have that connection with them. Although I don’t find the D-ialogues as tactically sophisticated as they can be at Tu. There’s it’s “diabetes sucks” or “high five at a success” whereas the most interesting threads on Tu for me seem to get a bit deeper into the nuts and bolts of successful approaches to D. But I always appreciated you bringing your professional expertise to conversations as well @Zoe , reminding people that diabetes and depression are linked and that professional help may, in fact, be needed even when we are not alone because of our online connections! I hope you can make time to drop by more often!

I just discovered your recent comments here. Good to read your words again. I guess with any community, time takes its toll. Some people move on and others join in. I’m thinking about the old adage, “you only get out of something what you put into it” is true. The focus of each of our lives changes with time and we all move on in some way.

I still enjoy interacting here but sometimes I find it irritating. People don’t always understand what you’re trying to say. And because the written word is stripped of the bandwidth of non-verbal cues sometimes people read into people’s words things that are just not there. I suppose it is no different than all forms of human communication. The opportunity for miscommunication is unfortunately high.

Good luck with however you are spending your time these days. I’m quickly drawing to a close my time living aboard my boat. I adopted this lifestyle 15 years ago and I’m ready to move on. There are other places to visit and people to meet. I expect I will look back on this period with a certain nostalgia but life rolls on.

Thanks again for checking in with us!

2 Likes