Coffee Drinkers, where are you?


#121

I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about a year ago. In my quest to find low carb, good tasting food, I started drinking coffee with Sweet&Low and sugar free french vanilla creamer (because it’s like an almost free dessert!). Since then I drink at least 2 cups every day. The only thing negative I’ve noticed is that to me, an extreme caffeine buzz feels oddly like a low, even if my BS is normal. So I have to think about how much caffeine I’ve had when I feel shaky to make sure I’m not attempting to correct a false low.


#122

T-1 since age of 6, Coffee drinking since 11. Coffee is the perfume of my life! Coffee with diabetes, dialysis, and with transplant. When I see you in Texas let’s have a cup of coffee. I have been around diabetes for over 90 years, including my brother’s T-1. All I know is something is going to kill all of us one of these days. Please pass the cream! No cream? No problem, I’ll take my black. Thank you.


#123

I have a giant cup of coffee, with a mix of Truvia and sugar and a cup of milk every day. Its my first breakfast. I can’t start a day without it. But I’ve heard caffeine is difficult on blood sugars. It could explain some issues I have in the morning.


#124

Where do you buy your beans, Aaron? I’ve been to a couple of different sites, the beans I purchase taste good, but I’m no conisour. I know what I brew is better than what Starbucks serves. Can’t stand that stuff.


#125

Ever try chocolate flavored coffee? I haven’t, yet. I’m not sure if it will ruin both of my vices at the same time


#126

Starbucks, Peete’s and many other west coast roasters favor dark heavy roasts which destroy the wonderful top notes and bring out the bottom end heavy flavors that tend towards bitterness. Coffee Review (www.coffeereview.com) is an excellent website with objective information and reviews of various coffees from many roasters. Start there. Read the background articles. Do a search for their highest rated coffees. All the really good roasters are represented. Any coffee they rate 92 and above is going to be outstanding. Great coffee is like fine wine. Within the realm of fine wine are lots of different taste profiles from different parts of the world, but all are enjoyable. Just as estate bottled wines are nicer than blended wines, so are single source coffees. We may develop particular preferences. One of my personal favorites is light roasted Ethopian Yirgecheffe. Be prepared to spend between $8 and $20 per pound plus shipping. Green Mountain Coffee (http://www.greenmountaincoffee.com) is a good place to start for both quality and value. Buy in small amounts, frequently so the beans are always fresh from the roster. The most important piece of coffee making equipment for the home is a quality conical burr grinder. I recommend the series made by Barzata, especially the Virtuoso. ( Buy a refurb model and save.) I use a very simple Melita cone filter resting on my coffee cup to prepare my coffee. If you are interested in more detailed information I have prepared a little essay covering my research and experience.


#127

I start my day with a cup of coffee that is 12 fluid ozs plus heated skim milk. My endo says this is fine and I have not noticed any particular effects from the coffee with respect to BG levels.


#128

I have…it’s delicious…heaven in a cup! (well, only if you add whipped cream!)


#129

Agreed! In addition to the Melita filter funnel, I use both the Bialetti Mukka Express and the Brikka. These are really not espresso machines but make a very satifying brew from espresso roast beans.


#130

Coffee is grown around the world in warm climates. The Domincan Republic is one such source.


#131

The cup markings on the great majority of coffee makers are WAYY WAYY OFF. It’s one of the most confusing and irrational bits of design engineering every purpetrated on the public. It’s probably the major reason newbies to coffee making can’t ever make a decent cup of coffee. So don’t go by the markings on the pot, use reliable measuring equipment.


#132

I like Jasmine tea with splenda late in the evening.


#133

I so love Jasmine tea…the steeped variety, with the little flowers floating atop! I sucked those back daily in university. Have strong memory of the aroma of Jasmine tea blended with linseed oil (I studied art!!)…sigh!


#134

I love coffee and will not give it up. I try to minimize my intake, though, since the stimulation from the caffeine can mimic a hypo.


#135

We drink very good coffee like Aaron describes. We brew it really strong and call it “coffee on a stick”; you could stick a fork in it. Yum. I take Lisinopril for blood pressure ( it’s also good for protecting kidneys) so I monitor my blood pressure to make sure it stays in check. Is there such a thing as life without coffee?


#136

Life without coffee…banish the thought!
The question is…is there coffee in Heaven! Wait, skip that…of course there is, it’s called Heaven, right?


#137

I was drinking reg. coffee every morning until my BS started going up and not coming down much during the day. I read it could be the caffine. So I switched to the dreaded DECAF coffee. My sugars still wasn’t doing any better. So I thought it might be the cheap strips I bought for my True Trac meter, a drug store brand. I bought a “One Touch Ultra Smart” today, took my stats and wha-la 111 ! I see real coffee in my future!


#138

i drink a lot of espresso, and i’ve heard the tales that coffee can raise your bg, however on a personal note, i’ve never seen any kind of rise in my own from coffee :slight_smile:


#139

My grandma who lived with T1 for over 60 years (diagnosed not long after the discovery of insulin) drank coffee every day of her life. I think the key is to be consistent.
Boy do I love coffee. You don’t want to see me without it. I’d rather quit alcohol, sweets, cheese, and the internet than give up my coffee.


#140

I love coffee as well. Bought an awesome espresso machine and I wake that baby up every morning before work. I dont care what the research says…