Increased anxiety watching sensor


#1

I have alot of anxiety when my sensor goes high and stays there. I have been looking at dexcom clarity and taking those results to heart. I know I shouldn’t probably do that as the sensor isn’t always accurate. Please tell me how to deal with this. HELP!


#2

How long have you been using cgm? How long does it take to get back in range.

I find the Clarity reports informative and empowering, and yes, sometimes discouraging. If things start to slip, I look forward to making improvement for the next set of results.

I try to focus on how much we get right to cope with the times it’s not going as well as I’d like.


#3

It would be good to do a finger stick when you have qyestions


#4

I’ve been using it off and on for the last 2 years but lately I been wearing it constantly. I usually get back in range in about an hour or two depending on what kind of food I ate. I just feel like my control isn’t as good as I would like it. For example, I tested my lunch basal rate and it was okay. When I eat I usually go above target. I eat pretty well the same thing for lunch. I increased my carb ratio yesterday because I think that might be the issue.


#5

Look for patterns!!! Normally high’s repeat themselves such as after meals, early morning, etc.

  1. Don’t go for perfection as you will be chasing your ups and downs and go crazy.
  2. Take 1 pattern at a time and try to make small improvement by making a small change. Small changes every few days in a pattern will yield huge improvements over a few weeks.
  3. When you are happy with the improvements of 1 of your unhappy patterns, slowly attack the next pattern.
  4. Take it one baby step at a time and don’t fret. It will get better.

#6

Thank you. I am deathly afraid of complications. I make it worse on myself. I am not working right now so I think about hardly anything else except my D. I am starting to volunteer at a retirement home. Hopefully that will put me in better spirits.


#7

I recently tore my meniscus ligament so walking after meals is also on hold for a bit.


#8

How much pre-bolus time do you use? Have you ever tried dosing and then waiting for the downward bend in the CGM trace before starting to eat?

I think appropriate pre-bolusing is one of the most under-used and under-appreciated tactics for dosing insulin. We can only make two choices when giving insulin: dose size and timing. To ignore timing or simply use a standard 15-minute pre-bolus can basically undermine good insulin timing.


#9

Dee - I’ll second what Terry suggested about adjusting your pre-bolus. At one time I was hesitant to pre-bolus any earlier than 10-15 minutes prior to a meal. I’d worry about not eating what I’d bolused for, and if at a restaurant, what if the meal was delayed?

Fast forward to the present, and assuming my BS is on target, and depending on the time of day and the amount of protein I’m going to eat, I pre-bolus up to an hour before eating (I don’t eat carbs so don’t have to worry about that).

Pre-bolusing is vital to maintaining target BG and minimizing the standard deviation of your BG. It’s also one of the keys to lowering your A1C, which of course minimizes longer-term damage.


#10

Pre-bolus is an awesome option to work on and should give you some quick easily seen positive results. And since you eat pretty much the same lunch each day and you have adjusted your insulin to carb ratio, you may also want to consider modifying your lunch for fewer carbs if you are unhappy with the amount of insulin you now take for lunch. If you read through the threads on this website, I think you will find that the individuals that consistently claim to keep the best control long term, are the individuals that have worked hard to limit carbs by both eating low carb foods and smaller portions that are in line with their lifestyle.


#11

Ya know, Dee, there are sometimes I can’t get those postpranials to cooperate until I’m taking too much basal…and that has other problems. How high are the post meal blood sugars going?


#12

Don’t be afraid to do finger sticks when you suspect it’s wrong, or simply just check periodically, like 3-4 times per day, if you have the strips. On day ONE, I test up to 10 times because for me, the G5 isn’t accurate for roughly 12-14 hours (sometimes). After the first day, it’s pretty smooth sailing for the next 6+ days, so I may test when it’s prudent, like when I’m about to drive, etc, just to be sure the sensor data is close to where it should be. Once in a while, the sensor is off by more than 40 points which can screw me up if I react to it’s false number, so it behooves me to check before doing a correction bolus. I chastise myself when I don’t check before doing a correction when it turns out the sensor was wrong, but I know that so often, the sensor is correct so I usually don’t second-guess it.


#13

I almost never eat unless I test under 100, but I do much better if my reading is around 80. I too prebolus when necessary.

By the way, if you follow a low fat plant based diet, then carbs aren’t the problem fat is.

I have followed both low carb and plant based low fat ways of eating. Both work beautifully to keep one’s A1c low and glocuse levels stable.


#14

If I were to wait until I tested under 100, following a pre-bolus, I almost guarantee that I will get low before my meal brings me back up to where I should be. I don’t stick to a hard and fast rule, but I’ve learned from many mistakes waiting to long after having IOB from a bolus,that waiting til under 100 is going to mess me up. It leads to weight gain for me if I have to either eat carbs before the meal is in front of me, or before long, I have to eat additional carbs because the meal hasn’t yet kicked in.


#15

Obviously we are all different Dave. I only prebolus if I am higher than I want to be before a meal. Normally I wait to eat only 10 to 15 minutes after injecting for a meal.


#16

I try to wait when the arrow is trending down when bolussing. I also have hypoglycemia unawareness and when my arrow is trending down my BSA will go below 5mmol before my food gets absorbed and that scares me. I try to wait 15min to eat after taking my bolus.


#17

What foods other than salad is there for a plant based diet. I looked online what a plant based diet is and it only includes whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Pretty limited.


#18

Yes, we do things differently. I wasn’t arguing with you. I was merely adding to the convo with my particular “method”. When I’ve waited too long after having IOB, to eat, I regret waiting. I’m not discounting what works for you.


#19

Rather than waiting 15min to eat when you pre-bolus, especially since you eat pretty much the same meals every day, you may want to consider watching the CGM and decide to eat when you drop to a certain level. When I pre-bolus 8 units or less, my arrow stays level, yet I drop about 1 mg/dL per minute about 16 minutes after pre-bolus. When pre-bolus over 8 units, my arrow trends down and I drop about 16 minutes after pre-bolus 2 mg/dL per minute. Normally it takes 16 minutes for my food to kick in and 26 minutes for insulin to kick in, but normal is for me and just a guide. (Times can vary quite a bit) which is why I prefer to watch the curve and the actual number rather than a set time. I will start to eat when my number drops to 76-80 to keep myself from going below 60 considering 16 minutes for food to kick in.

Sounds way more complicated than it really is but you should be easily able to set your own pre-bolus pattern.


#20

I thought the g5 sensor became more accurate the longer you wear it. Today at lunch I my bs went down to 4.8mmol according to the sensor.I had about 20 carbs. I wasn’t at home to test on my glucometer. When I got home 15minutes later the sensor said 12.9 and rising. It rose all the way up to 14.0. When I tested my glucometer said 12.3 so I changed my sensor. Hopefully