Know Your A1C: Spread The Word!


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This campaign represents the first ever national public education campaign supported by a coalition of leading nonprofit diabetes organizations, including the ADA, JDRF, American Association of Diabetes Educators and the National Council of La Raza. Check out the new campaign site at: http://www.DiabetesA1C.org.

DIABETES & A1C

Q. What is A1C and why is it important to me?
The A1C test is a critical step to managing your diabetes and risk of complications such as heart attack and stroke. The test is a quick and easy way to measure your blood glucose level over the previous three months. The test's result will tell you how well your diabetes is being controlled. Knowing your A1C level will help you and your doctor manage your diabetes long-term. Without proper management, diabetes can cause severe health issues such as heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and amputation. Diabetes management is a constant battle, and you need warning signs and reminders to stay the course. A1C will help you stay on track.

Q. How many Americans are affected by diabetes?
Nearly 21 million Americans are afflicted with diabetes, and two out of every three people with diabetes die of a heart attack or stroke.

Q. What will happen if I don't take the A1C test?
A1C assesses your glucose level over time and will tell you how well your diabetes is being controlled. Knowing your A1C will help you and your healthcare provider manage your diabetes long-term and lower your risk of complications such as heart attack and stroke. If you do not manage your diabetes, serious health complications can occur.

The goal for most people with diabetes is to maintain a consistent A1C score of less than 7 percent. Yet according to the Centers for Disease Control, 63% of all diabetes patients are out of control, with A1C levels above 7 percent. Talk to your healthcare provider about A1C, ask for help setting an appropriate A1C goal, and work with your healthcare provider to determine ways to reach your goals.

Q. How does an A1C test work?
There are two simple and accurate ways the test can be performed – by drawing blood from a vein in your arm or having your finger pricked for a blood sample. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine which procedure is best for you.

Q. There seems to be different levels of A1C that are considered healthy – what is standard?
The American Diabetes Association recommends that an A1C level of less than 7 percent for a person with diabetes is a healthy range. However, each individual's A1C goals are personalized, so talk to your healthcare provider about the right A1C level for you.

Q. How can we find out more about A1C?
Ask your healthcare provider to get more information. You can also call 1-877-TEST-A1C (1-877-837-8212) or visit www.DiabetesA1C.org for more information.