Lantus/Levemir Two Timers


#1

If anybody uses Lantus/Levemir 2x daily how do you handle time zone changes? Also are you able to adjust doses without having to wait for the 3 day delay Lantus/Levemir usually take to build up when give once daily? I read somewhere from a reliable medical source that these basal insulins when taken twice daily could be changed to allow for things as exercise, fasting, etc. without having to wait for the 3 day lag. Just wondering if anybody’s had some experience along these lines?


#2

I was not told anything by my doctor about waiting 3 days. I went from once a day in the am to twice a day the next day. I was having very high readings and then very low readings. My highs are not that high right now and my lows are not that low. I would check with your doctor. I would also think that it would depend on how much Lantus you take a day.


#3

Neal,

I have heard about the 3 day “depot effect” with Lantus. The idea is that it makes a pool in your fat layer and only gradually absorbs so it takes a few days for the cumulative doses to add up.

I recently started using a VERY tiny dose of Lantus–3 units a day–and because it is so tiny, I do not see any sign of the Depot effect and I have modified the dose in response to daily issues. But I have heard of the depot effect happening with someone who uses a dose of 25 units.

I also split my dose 2 units at night and 1 in the morning, because in the past my attempts to use Lantus were frustrated by 3 AM hypos. Splitting the dose avoids that.

Despite the tinyness of the dose, I’ve dropped my fbg from 120 to 90. It went up when I had to stop using R and NPH thanks to what seems to be the development of antibodies to R insulin.


#4

I used Levemir and don’t really know anything about the 3 day lag. The largest time difference I had while on it was 2 hours. A few days before I left, I just pushed back my dose time by about 1/2 hour or so. Seemed to work fine for me. I also only took about 5 or 6 units twice a day. So I didn’t have large doses of insulin to pool up.

  • Kim