Lets kick off this Month of November with everyones Diaversary!?

One day before my 24th birthday.

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I was diagnosed with type one diabetes on July 3rd, 1992. I was 34 years old. I had had gestational diabetes with my pregnancy. They told me when I got old and fat, and ate too much sugar, I might have to watch my diet. Four months later I got a viral sinus infection. I lost 40 pounds and felt miserable. Checked my BG and it was over 350. I went into the doctor kicking and screaming that I wasn’t old and I wasn’t fat and I couldn’t have diabetes. He took one look at me, said, “you got the skinny kind and will be on insulin the rest of your life”.

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My parents had to dip them in my diapers… I have wonderful parents!

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I was diagnosed T1 on February 4, 2015. I had all the typical symptoms (rapid weight loss, unquenchable thirst… and vision changes) that started several months after minor surgery. There’s only one other T1 in my large extended family (my first cousin) and many with various auto-immune diseases.

Have a great weekend!! :hibiscus::blush:

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My diaversary was in 2011 at age 70. Of that, I’m certain. The rest is somewhat debatable. Should I call my diaversary the day that I called my doctor’s office and got my lab report that told me my FBG a few days prior was 289? I knew very well what that meant, since I’d cared for my husband during his last years when he had diabetes.

Or should I call my diaversary the day about a week later when I called the office again and got the results of a confirmation blood test that showed my A1c of 11.5. (I then bought my own glucometer and test strips and started testing for the next three weeks.)

Or is my diaversary the date three weeks later when I had my appointment with my doctor, and basically said, “Looks like I have diabetes. Here are my BGs for the last three weeks. What do I do now?”

Of course, I was initially diagnosed as a type 2 and it wasn’t until March 2013 when I was correctly diagnosed as a type 1, LADA.

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I cut the glucose strip in half :grinning:

My diaversary was December 1970. Grandmother took me to the doc cause I was sleeping too much while on vacation. My BS was 800 and they sent me home and said to go to hospital the next day. I Was in the hospital for a week.

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I was diagnosed just last year in October. I found this fabulous group shortly after. I was not completely satisfied with my first endo and I found overwhelming support from everyone here. I’m so happy to have this to go to when I have questions.

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Pretty awesome to read this.
Extremely dehydrated, I couldn’t get enough, unfortunately I kept drinking orange juice for about a week, I was down about 45pounds over 2 weeks. My guess is February 10, 1985, my parents wheeled me into the Dr waiting room, Dr knew immediately. Checked my blood sugar, was 1281mg/dl, continued wheeling me right into the ambulance and off to the hospital I went for 10 days. I guess better to be young, because now I don’t know any different. 31yrs later, everything still works, I’ve been on a pump for about 16yrs. It could always be worse I say to myself every day…

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February 22, 1994.

Never been in DKA. My uncle and grandpa are both t1d, so when I started begging for constant bathroom breaks in the second grade, my parents had a pretty good idea what was up.

That didn’t stop me from running from the nurse when she went to prick my finger the first time. How many nurses does it take to catch and poke a six year old in a doctor’s office appointment room? Apparently three.

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June 2006. I was just a few weeks pregnant with my now 7yo daughter. I was on insulin within 3 months, and continue to this day. I guess I got caught really early. Good thing my endo who was managing hypothyroid had a high index of suspicion for diabetes, as well

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No, never split them. I did have a secondary testing kit to further test if ketones were present which included a test tube and reagent in tablet form to dissolve. Can’t remember the color code on that one.

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Who remembers when insulin was available OTC and cost $8 for regular, $12 for NPH?

A week before my 44th birthday at the biometrics screening for my work insurance the nurse said “your blood sugar is high, when were you diagnosed with diabetes?” I was “never” and she said get to your doctor right away. I was 384. A week later my doctor said definitely diabetes but let’s hope for type 2, you could lose 10 pounds. Drop all starchy carbs and up the exercise and you will have to see an endocrinologist. I did. Week after my birthday the endo told me it is type one “LADA” with very little insulin production, my daily exercise helped keep it from getting to DKA, but must start insulin the next day. This was August 5,2015. Had to work hard on exercise with insulin and cancel several planned events but this weekend I did a Ragnar Trail Run all in range - take that diabetes!

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July 1987. I was nine at the time. No DKA for me -just the usual thirst, up all night peeing, and eating all the candy in the candy bowl every day. I was staying at my grandparents and my grandfather was a Type 2 so the symptoms were quickly picked up on by the adults. After the second night peeing a lot and eating all the smarties in the house (Canadian Smarties are very different than US Smarties I will have you know.) out came the diastix to confirm the adult’s suspicions and then I was off to the doctors and the hosiptal in short order. I wasn’t really sick but was I was happy to get over the peeing and eating.

For the first couple of weeks I did not have a blood glucose meter and did the urine testing thing (I seem to think that the hosipital I was first staying in was 10 years behind the times when it came to diabetes care.) For some reason I can vaguely recall using the tablets in the test tube for testing urine as well as the diastix. Instead of test tubes my parents got three matching shot glasses (much more stable for a 9 year old) that I used for urine testing :smile: that had “Break Loose” written on them. Yes I still have them…

Also I started out being trained measuing blood glucose in mg/dl at the first hospital (near my grandparent’s) and then was transferred to a second (near where I was moving to) where they did mmol/l. At the time I actually prefered the mg/dl. Who knew at the time that being bilingual in glucose measurements would come in handy later in life.

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Ha, I like that! The old meters allowed a user to pick mmol/L or mg/dl, but I always used mmol/L. Then they took away the ability to switch, for fear users would accidentally pick the wrong unit of measurement (or some internal error would switch it by accident) and someone would think a reading of 50 was 5.0 and not treat the low or a reading of 120 was 12.0 and treat it as high… It actually did happen to me once where an old SureStep meter that I used for a brief time flipped over into mg/dl without me doing anything, and I saw 240 and thought it was 24.0, but thought that was awfully high and noticed there was no decimal point, so figured it out and was able to translate back. I can translate between them in my head at this point.

I’ve tried to include both systems when I write about BG levels here. I actually think it wouldn’t be hard to switch to mmol/L at this point. 4.0 mmol/L = 72 mg/dl and 8.0 mmol/L = 144 mg/dL, a good target range. 10.0 mmol/L = 180 mg/dL, another round number landmark that’s easy to remember. If I had to change, I could “think” in the mmol/L system fairly easily.

My then-11-1/2 year-old daughter was diagnosed with T1D on January 24, 2014. We were quite fortunate that she didn’t develop DKA before diagnosis. Two factors came into play that resulted in her early diagnosis. Firstly, I am a physician (not specializing in Endocrinology, however) and second, my daughter was bed- and wheelchair-bound after having had major orthopedic surgery on December 18, 2013. Because she was not able to walk at the time, she depended on me and her father to bring her food and water, so I noticed early on that she was drinking ginormous amounts of water and asking for the bedside commode frequently. By the second day or so, I told my husband that I suspected she had developed T1D. He took her to see her pediatrician that Friday morning. While my husband and daughter were on their way home, her pediatrician telephoned me to let me know that a direct admission to Doernbecher’s Children’s Hospital in Portland, Oregon was being arranged. During the hour-long drive to Portland, I had time to answer my daughter’s questions about diabetes. She handled this reasonably well, I think in part because one of her best girlfriends at school has three siblings with T1D, so she was familiar with some of what having diabetes involves. By hospital day two, my daughter was doing all her own injections. She only cried once, when we were being discharged and reality struck that her T1D was coming home with us.

I am so proud of my daughter; she is my hero!

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October 10, 1965. I was 10 years old and home from school for Columbus Day. I had to pee all the time and was always thirsty. I had those symptoms for a few weeks. No DKA. Was in the hospital for 3 weeks. Very primitive back then. No A1C tests, no blood testing meters, no human insulin. My mother was devastated. I had the most incredible sweet tooth so it rattled my world…but I learned to deal with it. Thank heavens the artificial sweeteners and the insulins have improved so dramatically.

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