Medical Cannabis?


#88

Do you think its safe to take aspirin as indicated on the bottle? If so, why? What data are you using to inform your judgement?


#89

Aspirin isn’t always safe, though I expect you’ll “reject” that. And the analogy of aspirin to cannabis falls down so many ways I can’t count them. If you choose to view me as a closed-minded martinet, feel free. I’m not getting drawn into one of these.


#90

[quote=“David_dns, post:87, topic:57691, full:true”]

First, you misrepresent what i said. I didn’t “reject” anything. I said anecdote is not evidence, and in the case of cannabis, it’s not.
[/quote]Please explain how I’m misrepresenting what you’re saying. You just said it right there again, quoted above. To repeat, you said, " I said anecdote is not evidence, and in the case of cannabis, it’s not".

Of course anecdote is “evidence”. At least, in my dictionary, and 54 years of speaking the English language, anecdotal experiences are certainly evidence. Just as, in a court of law, witness testimony is evidence.

Perhaps you’re use of terms is the problem, and you’re applying an overly narrow meaning to them?

Again, how am I misrepresenting you?

What I said was that it was not evidence that meet your standards, and therefore you don’t accept it. That’s very different than saying it isn’t evidence at all, which you just did.

Which is it? Is it not evidence at all, or is it evidence that doesn’t meet your standards for validity?


#91

You dodged the question, with an irrelevancy I had already pointed out. The question again, with some emphasis this time to make clear your objection above isn’t relevant:

Do you think it’s safe to take aspirin as indicated on the bottle? If so, why? What data are you using to inform your judgement?

And please, David, stop with the evasion. You know exactly what I’m talking about. Let’s try a different question: Have you ever put aspirin in your body? If so, how were you convinced it was safe to do so?


#92

I haven’t actually seen any evidence that I don’t have supernatural powers, or that gravity is real, or that I’m actually sitting here positing on this forum if I wanted to get really philosophical about it. Cogito ergo sum–I think therefore I am.


#93

A philosophic belief held by many… and, according to physicists, looking more and more like a fact :smiley:


#94

The sign of a great online community: your thread takes a detour into existentialism!


#95

I am unconvinced.

However, there is no question at all in my mind that I exist. :grin:


#96

Sorry… that was the ganja talking


#97

I thought I read something from the simulacrum “Sam19” in the computer-generated virtual reality that the aliens that captured, and are studying me have created and placed me in.

I haven’t told you all (I’ve tried before, you simulacrums just think I’m crazy), and I’m not supposed to know, but the memory blocks the aliens tried to put in place failed, and I remember everything.

Long live Emperor Zoldonkydonk! I will escape, and avenge your interstellar Empire!

:grin:


#98

For anyone interested, here’s a presentation on some of the science for pain and anxiety/ptsd: Therapeutic Potential: Pain and PTSD & Anxiety

It’s a conference put on by The National Institute of Drug Abuse. There are several interesting scientific presentations on youtube from this conference.


#99

Is CBD oil legal in all 50 states? When my mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer, I found promising potential of CDB as a cancer killer. D/T short life expectancy, I was understanding I could purchase in particular states but then would have to smuggle it to her. Never had enough time to try it.

IMO - Mother Nature remains the best Medicine Cabinet. Her cures may not be as FAST as synthesized (man made) pharmaceuticals but they are NATURAL.
http://nypost.com/2013/09/11/feds-patented-medical-marijuana-even-when-they-were-fighting-it/ On Oct. 7, 2003, the US government issued Patent No. 6,630,507 - TO ITSELF. Was this to keep it under “Lock & Key”? Patent No. 6,630,507, you see, is for cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants. Here’s what three scientists from the Department of Health and Human Services said in the abstract — or summary — of their findings submitted with the patent application: “The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroproectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke or trauma, or the treatment of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and HIV dementia.”
http://www.denverpost.com/2016/08/28/what-is-marijuana-patent-6630507/ NIH granted New York-based Kannalife Sciences Inc. an exclusive license for the part of the technology outlined in the patent to develop cannabinoid- and cannabidiol-based drugs for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy — brain damage that could result from conditions such as cirrhosis. “The patent expires on April 21, 2019, after which anyone would be free to develop drugs based on these cannabinoids that, like all drugs, would require FDA approval to demonstrate safety and effectiveness in humans.” No other companies have licensed portions of the 6,630,507 patent


#100

CBD oil from hemp is legal in all 50 states because the THC is negligible. That’s what I have been using.

There is some evidence to support the use of High CBD cannabis, though, for efficacy… in which case it is not legal In all states due to higher THC levels.

The CBD from hemp works for pain pretty well–I’d like to be able to use less and getter longer action…hoping the cannabis source will provide that. However, if I lived in a state where MC wasn’t legal, I would stay with CBD from hemp absolutely.


#101

OK - Yes I do understand that Hemp Oil is legal and could obtain via Amazon, etc. Reports varied for cancer use, CBD only vs CBD + some THC. Supposedly THC also terminated cancer growth and offered pain relief.


#102

Do you honestly believe that CBD oil, either with or without THC, can cure cancer?


#103

Oh yea, you didn’t know? We’ve figured out how to cure cancer a long time ago, it’s just that nobody wants to.


#104

I’ve learned to “Never say Never”. Without personal experience:
Would I put 95% faith in it? NO.
Would I eliminate it from personal attempt? NO.


#105

Agree. Jury is still out, though the studies done in test tubes and with mice are promising.


#106

If I had a dollar for every study with mice that was “promising” but ended up a dead end . . .

Still, gotta keep trying.


#107

My own opinion, and that’s all it is so be gentle.

The back and forth here has the same feel and tone to it, to me, that the never-ending abortion debate does.

People staking out the extremes in their arguments, ignoring the fact that things simply are not as black and white – even to them – as they present in their arguments.

This last back and forth about cancer is a great example. Should anyone believe in the curative efficacy of CBD for any type of cancer? No, such belief is without solid reasoning.

Should the possibility of bonafide therapeutic response to CBD be dismissed outright, and ridiculed? No, entertaining such possibilities is not only rational, but given other proven therapeutic benefits of CBD, it’s not grasping at straws.

Virtually all naturally-derived proven medicines started because of informal use by lay persons observing real effects, then passing this on culturally as part of the medicinal social knowlege. As I pointed out before, our trust in aspirin stems from precisely this social experience rather than modern rigorous scientific study and safety data.

It’s the same way we know that most of the common stuff we eat is safe. Because everyone eats it, and has for the span of human memory. Experience tells us its safe to eat an apple, not safe to eat a handful of poison oak leaves. A study didn’t tell me that – the cumulative experience of human culture learned, and taught me that as I grew up.

As far as cannabis is concerned, similarly the utility of the substance in helping with appetite and nausea are not things discovered via studies. Like aspirin, cannabis as a treatment for these problems is known from social experience.

So, this idea that there is nothing valid in terms of “data” in determining the efficacy and safety of something – be it a drug or food – is woefully incomplete, and flat out wrong. If adhered to strictly, it will result in bad results.