More insulin?

I RECENTLY WENT TO THE DIABETES EXPO IN PORTLAND,OR. I JUST STARTED USING NSULIN[METFORMIN WASN’T DOIN IT]. WELL- NEITHER WAS LANTUS. THE LANTUS PEOPLE TOLD ME TO UP MY DOSE FROM 10 1 MORE EACH DAY TILL I GET DOWN TO 100[ WHICH HASN’T HAPPENED IN 8 YEARS SINCE I WAS DIANOSED WITH TYPE 2. SHOULD I GO UP EVERY DAY?

I completely agree with Seagator. You should NEVER change your medication unless your DOCTOR or a CDE tells you to or has given you guidelines for how to make dosage changes yourself (people with type 1 diabetes adjust their insulin as needed, but that’s only because we’ve been taught how to do it). It is against the law for non-medical personnel, such as sales reps, to give that kind of advice. They can tell you how the drug works, but they cannot tell you how much to take. They really should be reported to the company if they’re doing that! Please call your doctor before making any changes!

I agree w/ Seagator and Allison to a certain degree. While this is a type 1 perspective (and Allison touched base w/ it that I’ve “been taught” how to do it), if my physician told me to take 20 units of insulin a day, and I went hypo all day long, I would make an adjustment starting the very next day…especially if I can’t get in to see my physician for a week or more. I realize this answer is an application of the problem in the reverse (you’re currently experiencing hypers instead of hypos), but the end result is the same.
For me, it’s my body, and while I’m going to discuss changes in medication with my physician, I’m going to make them regardless. And the pharmaceutical reps are trained to give guidelines and suggestions, but in their effort to remain “Fair and Balanced” (in the words of the FDA), I’m sure they gave you that information w/ the statement that “you should consult your physician before making these changes”. The drug reps may or may not have diabetes (most don’t, but some do) and so they may not have first-hand knowledge of it working, but they are properly trained in how the medications that they market and sell (of any type, not just insulin) work within the body. I mean, it’s their job to know and understand the information so they can market it to physicians appropriately.
So I would talk to you physician about the recommendations that were made to you by the sanofi (lantus) representatives, and make changes accordingly (if you and your physician see fit). And if you haven’t seen 100 in 8 years, I might also recommend finding a new physician to discuss those changes with. But again, that’s only my opinion.

THANKS- I WOULDN’T DO ANYTHING TO HURT ME-I HOPE. THE LANTUS REP GAVE ME A FLYER THAT SAID INCREASE BY 1 TILL 100, NOT JUST HER OPINON. AND I’M SURE THEY ARE KNOWLEDGEABLE ABOUT INSULIN DRUGS AND REACTIONS. AND A FAMILY DOC IS NOT AN EXPERT ON DIABETES. THEY HAD ME ON BYETTA AND CHANGED TO INSULIN- I DON’T KNOW WHY? RON

Byetta is a drug that helps the pancreas produce insulin more efficiently (or helps to increase the amount of insulin the pancreas produces). In some instances (like yours), the drug may not be effective. In this case, the physician took you off of it and prescribed insulin injections (so that you’re getting the right amount of insulin, one way or the other :slight_smile:

THANKS- YOU SOUND LIKE YOU KNOW YOUR STUFF!

I agree with both Seagator and Allison. It’s just to riskey without your Dr telling you what to do

I just listen to the Bernstein interview on Diabetes Daily. He suggested that long acting insulin needs to be broken into 3 doses to work effectively. Ask your doctor.

I actually disagree. I think many of us are used to making small changes to our own insulin on a regular basis, without checking in with the doctor all the time. As long as you make a very small change and leave it that way for a couple days and test, test, test for results you should be fine. Especially as a LADA I’d go nuts if I had to consult my doctor every time I make a change. Since we are altering our bolus and our I:C ratios on a regular basis, why is the basal any different?

Just FYI typing in all caps is considered yelling online!

Always consult your doc before changing any insulin dosing. if he gives you the okay then do it but the insulin reps don’t know you or your history and since your doc does he is going to have your best interest in mind.

If you’ve not been taught how to make insulin changes by your doctors office it makes it difficult.

It took me over a year to find an endo who would teach me how to adjust my basal insulin to reach my fasting glucose number (I do not bolus at this pint).

Sounds like you need to go to an endo. Family docs or Primary providers typically don’t have enough education in managing diabetes to be effective. My primary will help to a point when all other meds do not work and they put a patient on insulin they immediately refer you to an endo.

I also suggest reading Using Insulin by John Walsh which contains a lot of excellent information about insulin dose adjustments.

I AGREE WITH YOU- AND I DON’T KNOW WHAT AN ENDO IS- BUT WILL FIND OUT AND SEE ONE -RON

I THOUGHT JOHN WALSH WAS THE MOST WANTED GUY?

put it on my wish list.