Numerous islet transplantation trials underway and actively seeking patients @ ucsf

PEOPLE WITH TYPE I DIABETES: AGE 18 AND OLDER (ISLET CELL TRANSPLANTATION USING BELATACEPT)

Study Name: Prevention of Autoimmune Destruction and Rejection of human Pancreatic Islets Following Transplantation for Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

Study Sponsors: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation

Principal Investigators: Dr Peter Stock and Dr Andrew Posselt

Who can sign up for this study? Type I Diabetics over 18 years of age, weighing less than 80kgs (175 lbs), with good kidney function and no previous transplant of any kind. Other inclusion and exclusion criteria apply.

More details here.

i thought that they were also working with neuro encapsulation that would not require immune-suppressant drugs… i wonder if the trade off is all that good. those drugs, even aside from the effect that they were designed to have, cause severe issues with the liver. not to be a nay sayer, hopefully this is just the first generation of treatment that will lead to a real solution… good on 'em!

I appreciate the work they are doing…but on the other side of the coin…they exclude way too many viable candidates in their tests, either by age, weight, or length of diagnosis. Case in point, I am 40, 190lbs, was diagnosed with onset Type 1(really type 1.5 LADA) in 2006.
University of Chicago is doing some of the same studies…go check it out: http://www.uchospitals.edu/specialties/transplant/pancreas-islet.html

Hi Manny,
I find this discussion particularly interesting… Are you aware of xenotransplantation research (http://www.lctglobal.com/)? It’s extremely interesting and will probably beat human embryonic tissue into the mainstream. The neat thing is that it doesn’t require immunosuppression. Since it’s being studied in New Zealand, that’s actually a really good thing since they are so immensely careful about risks of research (ie in this case, risk of spread of pig viruses into human populations). I was a doctor in Australia for a year, and New Zealanders are famous for being very cautious with human research trials. It makes me trust the true risks of the research a bit more.

If you read the .pdf and background info, you’ll see that two people are cured of their diabetes from phase II trials and that the product is going commercial in Russia as they have minimal restrictions on applying research in early stages to humans. Check it out… I’d be interested in hearing what you all have to say about it.