Open to tips to lower A1C


#41

Thank you. I definitely agree about the stress affecting me. I did have my thyroid checked and my TSH, T3/T4 levels were all normal. It’s odd because some days I’m not hungry at all and have to remind myself to eat and others I am flat out starving. I’ve noticed sometimes it is when I’m high and then others I’m in normal range.


#42

Remember only insoluble fiber is indigestible. Soluble fiber will raise BG, albeit slowly. Also remember we need both to foster a healthy gut biome. Eat real non-processed foods for as much of your diet as you can. Minimize your carbs in a way that is sustainable for you, then set the bar even lower and see how it goes.


#43

For me, pre-bolusing, exercise, and carb reduction are key. Stress reduction and good sleep are also very important. Do NOT believe the marketing blurb from the pharma companies - most people need a pre-bolus of about 10-15 minutes, perhaps except for after exercise, because insulin works much faster then due to increased blood flow and heightened insulin sensitivity.

Carb reduction means fewer BG rollercoasters, and the remaining ones are not nearly as severe. You also inject less insulin, and that can help if you have weight gain problems due to insulin.

Overall, I’d recommend reducing carbs and getting yourself a couple of recipes for meals that you eat during the week. You carefully study how these meals affect your BG, how many carbs are in there, and how you best inject for them. If you have a couple of these “familiar meals”, you can prepare them in the weekend for the next week, and you no longer have to rely on guessing the carb content of food from the cafeteria, or from food from a takeaway etc. Result: Much better BG control. And, it is overall much healthier, because you prepare them yourself, so you know exactly how many carbs are in there, how much sugar, salt etc.

You can then still have some “unknown” meals every now and then (for example, in a party, or over the weekend with friends etc.). The benefit here is that in at least 5 of 7 days of the week, you eat predictable, well-studied meals, so in these 5 of the 7 days, your BG control is very good. So, occasionally, you can “risk” a less ideal BG control if you want to try out something new, because one accident won’t mess up your long term BG control much.

As for stress and sleep - well, lack of sleep is a stressful situation for the body. And stress triggers the release of hormones like cortisol, which heighten insulin resistance and stimulate liver glucose secretion. So, chill out, and sleep well.


#44

I also want to add to this that eating healthy fats is highly recommended. In particular, most of us eat nowhere near enough omega-3 fatty acids. This can be migitated by eating more fish and by using oils that are rich in omega-3. Linseed oil is an excellent choice. I use that one in my salads.

This is about oils for salad though. For cooking, pay attention to the burning point instead. You don’t want the cooking oil to start smoking, because otherwise, harmful substances may form. Pick an oil with a very high burning point. Refined oils are good for that. I’ve also heard that avocado oil is excellent for cooking.

In sum, keep one oil (with lots of omega-3) for the salads, and another oil (with a high burning point) for cooking. And don’t ever mix up the two.


#45

Thanks! I love avocado oil!


#46

I can so relate to this… what helped me get back on track after a burnout was to purchase an elliptical. On times where I struggle with motivation or burnout, I commit to at least 10 mins when I wake up and before bed. That way I at least get 20 minutes in. It’s hard when I’m exhausted, but I can always manage to motivate myself for 10 minutes.

And best of all I can workout in my PJ’s! lol


#47

Gail12

Not sure how I respond to you.