Rare Form of Type 2?


#1

I was watching a new version of Iylana fix my life. The gentleman on the show had his leg amputated due to T2D. I tried replaying the section several times but I didn’t understand everything he said about it. What I thought he said was he was T2D and some how got a rare form of frostbite that 2-6% of T2D get. It spread to an infection into the bone and he had to get his leg amputated. Is this possible?


#2

Any type of diabetic can be at increased risk for poor circulation as a complication of diabetes, and poor circulation then increases risk of frostbite (as might neuropathy I’d imagine, if you can’t sense the problem). Once the tissue is very badly frostbitten, it can get infected, and poor circulation/neuropathy might also contribute to faster worsening of the infection and/or slowness to realize its presence and the need for treatment, all of which would increase risk for severe enough sepsis to warrant amputation. It’s all why it’s important to be careful re: feet for diabetics, especially if those complications are present.


#3

Thank you for the information. what I don’t like about this situation is folks that are not informed blaming diabetes for their amputation due to frostbite. Now I don’t know all the circumstances that involved in the decision to amputate a limb but sometimes folks have to responsible for their actions. If you are obese and doing things in extreme cold weather knowing you have a condition then perhaps its best to allow somebody else be the hero.


#4

Amputations is common in diabetics.

Diabetes amputations

I believe the drug invokana may have this listed as possible side effect.

But have not heard of frostbite being related, but frostbite plus poor circulation and poor BG control could combine to increase risk of infection or poor healing, leading to amputation.


#5

Doesn’t really have anything to do with being obese per se—the rest of your sentence, sure, but that part could be dropped. Plenty of diabetics aren’t obese (including some with those complications), and plenty of obese people don’t have diabetes and have perfectly healthy circulation (and for that matter, may well be generally healthy).