Sensors and Protein (go figure)

Two unrelated questions.

Why do sensors stop reading fluid? Right now I am in my 4th week with a sensor it is is very accurate. Why do sensors fail? I would think if inserted properly and kept safe they should continue to read fluid for a long period of time. Why do some sensors last ten days and others last a lot longer?

There are different opinions as to proteins causing a rise in BG. I have read that protein can cause BG to rise in 3-6 hours after eating and at a rate of 1g protein will convert to .5g carb.
I have also read that proteins increase insulin resistance which means BG will rise because insulin is not as effective. What do others find concerning protein and their effect on BG?

Sensors’ active material wears out with usage.

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Sensors - the simple flexing of the body can change readings, restricting or allowing more flow of the interstitial fluids. We have fought a number of false lows thanks to this. Their lifespan is now artificially set to 10 days, to keep results accurate. We found that the older the sensor gets, the more often we have breaks in the data, as well as false lows. For the G6, we’ve had less than 50% of them age to the 10 day limit - they’ve had to be replaced sooner due to loss of data, or invalid data. Believe me, if there were a 30 day sensor which stayed accurate throughout, they’d sell it in a heartbeat to corner the market.

Re: Proteins. I see ZERO data to support this. Anyone who has done a multi-day zero carb day can tell you that they don’t see spikes in basal needs. I do see fats and proteins affecting insulin utilization - the body opts to burn fats over sugars at different times, even when carbs are available. Stress has been a clear contender, thanks to the liver dumping sugar to keep numbers high, even when adding more insulin. Once the stress is over, watch out for those huge drops in the numbers!

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Protein absolutely requires insulin. You are correct, a zero-carb or low-carb diet will typically not increase basal needs and basal rates will likely drop. However, any protein consumed will require insulin to avoid a spike as the body converts a portion of protein into glucose through gluconeogenesis. The amount and rate of conversion is hard to determine, but generally a greater portion of the protein will be converted to glucose at a quicker rate when consumer less carbs.

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I find it is more important to dose for protein if I am consuming few carbs, as a greater portion of the protein will convert to glucose at a quicker rate. It’s probably different for everyone and not always consistent, as everything with diabetes is. If I am consuming a very low-carb diet I will use Regular insulin, as Dr. Bernstein suggests, to cover protein as it has a profile that closely matches how protein digests/converts to glucose - an onset of 45 min to an hour, peak at 1.5-2.5 hours, and lasts 6-8 hours.

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