Strange decrease in need for insulin

#1

I recently had 4 ER visits in a week which finally ended in having my Gall Bladder removed, followed by a stubborn infection in on e of the incision sites. When all was said and done I had lost almost 25 pounds.

Prior to all this, I was using 15 to 18 units of Novolog and about 30 to 35 units of Levemir.
Now, I find that my insulin requirement is reduced by about 90%! My primary care physician knows this and he just sort of shrugged and said it “sounds like good new to me.”

Does anyone have any insight into this?

#2

The 25pound loss would have an impact on insulin use I would think. Glad you are feeling better. Nancy50

#3

Much better thank you Nancy. You are probably right, but I never expected it to drop off like that.

#4

As a T1, losing/gaining a few pounds does impact my insulin needs, but it’s somewhat limited because my body doesn’t produce any insulin at all.

I imagine it might be more pronounced for someone with insulin resistance since there’s a correlation between insulin resistance and weight.

It may be worth asking the doctor if there’s a chance that whatever was occurring with your gall bladder may have been aggravating your pancreas.

#5

That is a distinct possibility. I will ask, but I don’t expect much of an answer. It certainly seems that my pancreas may be producing more of its own insulin now.

#6

You found the cure🤣. Lol.

I have no idea.

#7

Its surprising what 25 lbs can do. My dad just lost that and we were shocked at the reduction in blood pressure. He needs to drop his dosage because he’s getting light headed.

That is a super big reduction. I don’t see changes like that from 20 lbs, but I am a type 1. Congratulations on your accidental success. :slight_smile:

#8

It has been ten months since my original post and almost a year since the gall bladder surgery. I’m still down 25 pounds and still have a much reduced insulin requirement.

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#9

Congratulations - That is great news. The greater the 25 pounds were of your overall weight, the bigger the drop for insulin would normally be. If I dropped 25 lbs, there would not be much left of me as I am 5 ft 9 in and only normally weigh 125 lbs.

Just out of curiosity, did you eat the same after gall bladder surgery or did you change your daily diet?

#10

No change in diet, perhaps a little less greasy food.

#11

I am wondering how long you had been on that insulin dose? Gallbladder infections can happen and you get partial blockages because of that. And they can be stubborn infections. I can only say from experience with one of my dogs in the past.

It turns out she had an infection in the duct? And that she had probably had it for a while, maybe 6 months plus, a blood test showed something was only a little off so they did an ultrasound and spotted it because of that. She had blood work done every 3-6 months because she had stomach issues from a problem of improperly digesting protein. But the type of infection she had is very stubborn too. So she had to be on antibiotics for 3-6 months to clear it up and I gather that’s common with this type of infection.

And when you have infections, your insulin needs go up. Gallbladder and infection gone and you are back to needing a what would be “normal dose”. And that would be decreased too because of weight loss. I think even a 10% weight loss is supposed to make a pretty huge difference on type 2’s usually. So depending how long you had been taking that dose of insulin…

Just an idea! Otherwise other than weight loss, not a clue!