Type 1 and a Low Carb-High Fat Diet

I agree with u 100% …I am T1 and took my A1c from 10 to 5.6 by following LCHF

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I"m not terry4 but I don’t find it a big deal to have tubing. once in a while it can be a pain, but I will never lose my pump (do to the tethering) and I don’t have to worry about some of the issues that Omnipod users have to contend with (reliability, excess insulin usage, etc). I also don’t like the idea of such a large device placed on my skin. I wear the smallest possible sets, which are the Sure-T’s. they are quite flat and only the connector, located 4" away from the set, sticks up a little, but is still very low-profile compared to an Omnipod (as in a few orders of magnitude)

I went on low carb inMay and my A1C went from 12 to 8.
It has been better all around health wise.
I find the lows still come but much easier to fix and regain control.
When it goes high it feels so much worse now. My energy goes right out of me.
But the lo carb, better bg is so much smoother and I hope 8 will slide down to 6 in 3 more months. I use a pump but no CGM.

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Back in the 1990s when I first was diagnosed with Type 2, the low carb approach to managing diabetes was making a comeback after years in ‘hibernation’. For the record, low carb or even starvation diets as a way of managing diabetes type 1 or 2 is nothing new, that trend has come and gone numerous times of the past centuries. Anyhow, back to the nineties, my support team at the St. Pauls hospital diabetes center here in Vancouver Canada strongly advised against the low or no carb approach, citing that the most common cause of complications and death in diabetics is not from high blood sugar and neuropathy, though that can be serious enough, but from kidney failure and heart disease attributed in large part to a diet high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates. I took those warnings seriously and have been happy with my low GI carb since. Now that the pendulum has swung back in favour of high fat and protein and low carb, with several studies citing at least the short term benefits of those dietary models, I haven’t noticed any of the usual warnings that were so prevalent in the past, including how a diet very high in protein could easily lead to someone ending up in a kidney dialysis machine in their final days and about the many diabetics who succumbed to heart attacks in their 40s or 50s after a lifetime of low carb and high fat. Has the science changed here or has the wind gone out of the dietitians?

There never was any science behind these claims about low carb diets. One study of nurses found that patients with kidney failure had an association of accelerated kidney decline with high protein in their diet. But it turns out that there is no association when you have normal kidney function and guess what low carb diets are not high protein diets, they are high fat. This was basically scaremongering.

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i significantly cut down on my carbs once i got my Dexcom. when i was able to see the trends i realized how frequently i was spiking and then slowly going back down to a more “normal” range. so, i cut out the carbs to as little as possible and started eating mostly protein (which i need to bolus for; usually 1 unit per serving) and fat, like peanut butter and cheese. i am very skinny now. lost about 10 pounds, which i certainly didn’t need to lose, and more importantly, screwed up my belly fat making it difficult to attach my sensor. but, i went from an 8.9 A1c to a 6.5 A1c. so the diet has definitely improved my health w/ regard to my D. my solution: high protein and high fat, lowest carbs possible. my typical insulin/day is about 20 units.

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With LCHF, You can have normal protein and replace the carbs with fat. The mix can be about 70% fat, 20% protein (10-30%) and 10% carb, it isn’t normally a high protein diet.

I would suggest any T1 watch Bernstein’s video or even buy his book

the other thing is TAG total available glucose, when T1’s bolus for protein as well.

I think, if your weight is fine, you don’t need to reduce carbs, if your A1C is in range and you don’t go too high or low much, you also don’t need to reduce your carbs. going by the obesity in the general community about 2/3 of us have trouble metabolizing carbs

I agree, Jack. There is another diabetes website where all members, including type 1’s, are advised to follow a LCHF diet. So many people with diabetes do not seem to realize that some of us can eat higher amounts of carbs and still have good A1c’s, and not be overweight.

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I agree, Richard. And those same some of us can rock a flat line bg’s most of the time. I wonder why this truth receives so much rejection and can’t be suggested without argument. I have been enjoying peaches and watermelon lately…summertime fruits are the best carbs!!

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karen57 and Richard157, I hope to be able to manage moderate carb and BG. I tried the LCHF. It has been too difficult for me. My family eat “traditionally” healthy. Veggies, fruits, protein (meats)…and well, some/moderate amounts of ice cream and some cakes/sweets (once or twice a week)

Would a total daily carb intake of about 100g +/- 20 considered to be moderate carb? If anyone takes in about 100g daily, do you count the protein conversion to carb when you bolus?

The only carbs I count are carbs. I don’t add in anything else from protein, and that works for me. YMMV. Life is complicated enough without more conversions and besides, I don’t need to do that.

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@phoenixbound, I thought so too. (I had been ignoring proteins and broccoli! until I looked at the numbers.) I started to notice that I was habitually getting high after about 3 to 4 hours after insulin injection for meals. When I reworked the numbers taking into consideration protein and even green vegetables…the numbers made a little more sense. But it isn’t an exact science.

So far it’s “close” when I bolus about 3-4 units for a meal and may have to correct at about 2 hours after the meal.

it’s all about timing, getting the right I:C ratio, the type of food eaten, the activity level, and the phases of the moon. When I am very active my insulin acts as if it is turbocharged. :slight_smile: When I spend too many days doing little physical activity, it’s like having insulin resistance. If I eat too much fatty foods, I become resistant for a period of time. EVERYTHING we do affects our fasting and our PP bg readings when we are T1. Other types don’t have the same issues–they have their own set of issues with bg control.

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[quote=“lh378, post:79, topic:46521, full:true”]
I thought so too. (I had been ignoring proteins and broccoli! until I looked at the numbers.) I started to notice that I was habitually getting high after about 3 to 4 hours after insulin injection for meals. When I reworked the numbers taking into consideration protein and even green vegetables…the numbers made a little more sense. But it isn’t an exact science.

So far it’s “close” when I bolus about 3-4 units for a meal and may have to correct at about 2 hours after the meal.
[/quote]The part in bold is my experience also and sometimes even longer. I can’t ignore protein, fat, or anything. The protein takes a long time to metabolize for me so I end up doing a correction if I’ve eaten more than a small serving, which is rare anyway. I never know when the spike will occur so I watch and fix as needed. I’ll be snarfing a ball park dog and will bolus for the bread, and the condiments, and will fix the dog later. I wonder why you thought it was okay to ignore broccoli and greens? I bolus for every single thing that I eat, even a peanut :smile:

I did not think that broccoli was that “starchy” or “carbby”.

At first, I wondered, is the insulin bad? It seemed to have stopped working at 3 to 4 hours.

Well broccoli sure is not sans all sorts of nutrients Ih378 - one serving has all this and should be counted:

Calories 50

Total Fat 0.6 g
Saturated fat 0.1 g Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g Monounsaturated fat 0 g Cholesterol 0 mg
Sodium 49 mg
Potassium 468 mg
Total Carbohydrate 10 g
Dietary fiber 3.8 g
Sugar 2.5 g
Protein 4.2 g

and then there is all the other stuff, like the vitamins and calcium and so on…LOL There is no doubt it is worth eating and bolusing for!

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“guess what low carb diets are not high protein diets, they are high fat. This was basically scaremongering.”

I suppose that might be the case for some people but not for everyone. Because of the dietary advisories we were subjected to over the last half century many low carbers have habitually trimmed fat off their steaks or pork chops, and chosen the leanest parts of the chicken (breasts) while sticking to low carb. And it is an unarguable fact that the prevalence of kidney failure and need for dialysis has been much greater among diabetics than the general population, particularly a few decades ago when the only dietary advice given to diabetics was to avoid carbs and eat plenty of fat and protein. So I don’t believe that was scaremongering, nor where the studies showing the high incidence rate of heart failure among diabetics who had stuck to a lifetime of eating high fat and protein and low carb.

Thanks for response. My wife has a family history of T2D and recently her physician indicated that she may become “pre-diabetic” ( I thought this disease was binary). She’s a Hindu vegetarian and has been all her life. That means eating nothing with a nervous system. Her physician recommended eating less carbs and more animal protein but is ignorant (and unaccepting) to the cultural and religious traditions as to why eating animals is unacceptable to my wife. So we basically fired her.

But you say this is less about protein and more about eating health fats. That’s both good to hear – my wife was stressing about the idea of eating animals – since she already eats avocados, nuts, seeds etc. She’s not a fan of coconut, however. I’ll look into the omega 3 ALA. She’s also got fibromyalgia so we will have to be careful about not causing inflammation.

Thanks for your help.

Agree. If I had to spend 15 minutes before each meal computing carb/insulin rations and fat/insulin ration and protein/insulin ratios I would find it better to avoid eating altogether. I bolus for the carbs only.

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