What would you tell the next US President about what is needed to improve life with type 1 diabetes?

I received this communication a little while ago. Thought you may be interested in participating in this initiative. I submited this video.

WHAT: Novo Nordisk, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), Discovery Health, and Discovery Education are teaming up to launch Young Voices: Life with Diabetes, a national Web-based video campaign encouraging teens and young adults to share their insights on challenges they face living with diabetes. Building on the momentum of the upcoming presidential election, participants are asked to record a video message to the incoming president highlighting their attitudes, wishes and needs and how the government can improve diabetes care. For each submission, Novo Nordisk will donate funds to JDRF (up to $25,000).

WHEN: Videos will be accepted through midnight (ET) October 24, 2008. Ten videos will be selected and posted on the site on or about the first week in November for the public to view. The top videos will be voted on and featured during the World Diabetes Day Young Voices: Life with Diabetes Forum to be held in New York City at the ESPN Zone in Times Square on November 14, 2008. The Youth Forum, moderated by ESPN anchor Brian Kenny, will bring together teens and young adults living with type 1 diabetes to share experiences dealing with life transitions while managing the disease.

WHY: Type 1 diabetes affects an estimated 5-10 percent of the 23.6 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes. While type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, peak incidence occurs during puberty. For any young person these days, the transition from adolescence into adulthood is full of life-changing experiences. For teens and young adults with type 1 diabetes, however, the unique challenge of living with this chronic illness complicates an often troublesome period in their lives. The Young Voices: Life with Diabetes video campaign and Youth Forum provide a platform for support and camaraderie among teens and young adults living with this disease.

WHERE: Video entries can be submitted at www.DiscoveryHealth.com.

The first thing is they could get their facts right. The vast majority of new-onset Type 1 autoimmune diabetes is seen in adults. If all the new onset adult Type 1’s are included in the statistics for Type 1, that represents about 20% of all diabetes.

Manny … point your new president in the direction of Ontario, Canada.
As you may know, medical care costs nothing in Canada … doctor visits, hospital visits, flu shots, surgeries, etc. It is all funded by the government. Well, diabetes costs the health care system a fortune. In order to try and reduce the financial strain diabetes brings to the health care system, effective Sep 1/08, Ontario is supplying insulin pumps to any type 1 who would like one. Additionally, they are providing $200/month to help pay for supplies. The government believes the $750 million investment will help them save many times that amount over time. With better control there are fewer hospitalizations for everything from bad hypos to amputations.

Imagine, a government being proactive with this killer disease!

Bernard just posted about this on his blog:
http://www.bernardfarrell.com/blog/2008/10/tell-president-about-type-1-diabetes.htm

This is a great opportunity to raise awareness!

Well I am going to make a video for this Fo’ So

Are we all just kidding ourselves about stem cells and DNA research? I mean really what LEAPS have we made with such great technologies at our finger tips. Is a “managable disease” (which I hate diabetes falls under) is that really enough?

How about a tax cut for us? I spent over $300 in supplies this month… OUTCH… literally. :frowning:

But I’m still a Happy Diabetic, frustrated but happy

Sorry, amiga… I actually included “US” in the title of the topic in order to make it clear that this contest was related to the US election. It was not meant in any way to imply that everyone here is from the US or anything like that. I do my best to try to make things “global” every chance I get.

We need a socialized medical system. Let’s see…there was that 700 billion dollar bailout money, plus that and then some spent in Iraq so far. Why are we spending so much sending people into space when people on the earth can’t even get medical care? Or food. We need to re-examine our priorities.

I am here and love a great country like yours to give all the world the lead in offering the best care for diabetics so we all can follow. International diabetes federation recommended this great community to me and it is going to be global.

love to be more positive… great reply

I know this is none of my business other than I hope and pray that your Government takes their heads out of their ----- and start looking after the People that put them there and are paying their wages…everytime. I realize our Government and Health Care System isn’t the Best BUT after my Hubby’s recent MVA, all the Good care he has received and is still receiving in our home, just like I did for years when I was on disability, I thank God that I live on this side of the border. And we pay a big fat ZERO out of pocket when the trauma occurs so the Families can focus on their loved ones not stressing out about outrageous hospital bills.

As usual, I was reading the world news and came across these interesting discussions and links on your important topic. Some Good ideas and thoughts there. Again, I pray your NEW Government will work FOR you. You’s are Good People and deserve much better and not just in Health Care.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/talkingamerica/2008/10/bill_of_health.html

Funny how the phrase ‘socialized medicine’ actually is preconceived as a scary notion. Goodness you’d have to watch your mouth… pulling for the social welfare of a nation. (I speak facetiously, of course). The US loves the ‘business of diabetes’ too much to allow something like the profits of ‘chronic disease’ slip away.

Awesome bulletin, Manny!!
Thanks for the uplifting messages, 1HappyDiabetic!!

…I’m as stymied as the next voter for election 2008. I hope the next (and last) debate reveals some answers!!

Allison Love Beatty - Diabetes Consumer Advocate
Making the World Safer for People with Diabetes
http://www.alliesvoice.com/

American diet seen as key factor driving up U.S. healthcare costs.

In an essay in the New York Times Magazine (10/12, MM62), Michael Pollan, the Knight Professor of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, offered advice to the next president on a wide range of issues including how the American diet has impacted the U.S. healthcare system. Pollan argued that “one of the biggest, and perhaps most tractable,” reason for increasing healthcare costs “is the cost to the system of preventable chronic diseases. Four of the top 10 killers in America today are chronic diseases linked to diet: heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes, and cancer. It is no coincidence that in the years national spending on healthcare went from five percent to 16 percent of national income, spending on food has fallen by a comparable amount – from 18 percent of household income to less than 10 percent.” Pollan stated that healthcare reform will depend on “confronting the public-health catastrophe that is the modern American diet.”

first of all the country is in DIRE need of education about the condition. Right now people’s knowledge about it is pathetic.

I hear that totally - ignoramouses just let the words “diabetes is a manageable/preventable disease” fall out of their mouth like vomit. I would like to kick them

Manageble, to a certain extent. But if you don’t have it YOU DON’T KNOW HOW IT FEELS.

there are people from other countries here what in the world are you talking about.

Yes, if we could start by changing the menus on public schools, and educating our children about healthy eating habits, we will be giving a huge step. I guess I will read this book.

Allison, your too kind :slight_smile:

Costs could definitely be improved with a better health care system in this country. I am lucky to have employer paid benefits which are fantastic.
I am more interested in finding a CURE. Treatment is fine but living with it, and the potential for longterm side-effects is not. Approve stem-cell research, find ways to do islet cell transplants that aren’t rejected. Work towards a CURE rather than new treatment options.

I’m French, I’m living in France and I’m on Tudiabetes. … diabetics come from all the world… There’s no election next month in France but in my country or anywhere else We are fighting to get the same. Everyday I read in newspapers that diabetics need too much medecine, they ruin the country, it’s their fault… It’s the same story everywhere. I hope your next president will think about all the diabetics. I hope for a change.

Oh, I’d definitely have a thing or two to say about the healthcare system in the US and what its costs are doing to middle class families like mine. My son is underinsured, because we couldn’t afford a comprehensive policy (yet we’re “too rich” for social services) and we never imagined this would happen. We have no prescription coverage. Which meant I dropped $1100+ out of pocket on his supplies the first day we came home. I don’t have that kind of money, but I paid it anyway. There’s no way I can afford the insulin pump his endo wants him to have. Now in trying to enroll on the state Medicare program, I look at the form and they want all sorts of information about how much money I make and what I have in savings and what’s in my 401K, yet they never appear to want to know how much debt I’m carrying—funny, that. If you look at just the assets I have alone, you’d think I am doing pretty well, but if you take a look at my mortgage and credit card debt, you’d think something else. The only thing in my favor, if you can call it that, is that my spouse is unemployed and in an industry (he’s a finish carpenter) that’s really hurting right now, so I’m supporting all five of us on just my salary, which looks smaller and smaller all the time. I totally hate the thought of being on public assistance, but I’ve no choice—I can’t afford any of the supplies my son needs any other way. It’s stressing me out! And I’m far from alone in that. So yes, I’d say the healthcare system is Priority #1.