Doctors group recommends relaxed A1c targets for people with T2D

Not sure that this is what we want to see (yeah, not “unbiased reporting”), but the American College or Physicians revised its guidance on Type 2 management, recommending higher A1c targets of 7.0% to 8.0% than in the past.

I saw a statement from the ADA that said that the ADA is sticking with its current guidelines.

Here’s the report:

http://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2674121/hemoglobin-1c-targets-glycemic-control-pharmacologic-therapy-nonpregnant-adults-type

I haven’t trusted the ADA since about a month after I was dx so I am certainly not going to trust them now. THIS is one of their dumber ideas yet. I assume it will help their funders from Big Pharma by keeping more of us on more drugs for longer…Sigh…Judith in Portland

I don’t think the ADA suggested the new guidelines. In fact, I think they’re standing against them. The article states that the ADA’s recommendation/guideline is an A1c <7% whereas The American College of Physicians is advocating for an A1c recommendation/guideline of between 7-8% for most patients.

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Thanks! I see ADA and see red…details fall away—LOL…

However, my answer is similar. Raising that guideline is a very stupid idea as far as I am concerned. And it demonstrates a level of stupidity in medical circles that one hates to see----but that many of us have experienced waaay too often! As in—they will try to make it easier to comply with so Their “success rate” goes up—and because they think T2s are lazy slobs with no discipline to adhere to a guideline that requires tighter control…

Sorry to be so cynical, but—we’ve been here before…Judith in Portland…

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I totally agree that the new guideline proposed by The American College of Physicians is unacceptable. It could be appropriate for certain high-risk individuals, but not as a general guideline.

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Trust aside, in this case, the ADA is defending the concept of lower targets to avoid complications and the personalized targets.

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Yes, they’re still not setting their targets low enough to actually avoid complications, and they’re also terribly behind the times on the role of carbohydrate intake on any diabetic. But in this particular fight, they (the ADA) are right to stick to their own guidelines, even if they don’t go far enough.

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As I said—I misread where the new guidelines were coming from. I’m delighted the ADA is on the “right” side of this one, though I’ll never forgive them for how they misled me a decade ago when I was a know-nothing newbie…

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Since I’m still a newbie, I get your visceral dislike of the ADA. I still occasionally get a doctor or nurse who tells me I have to up my carbohydrate intake or I’m endangering myself. And I also get “there is no reason why you should try to have normal blood sugars as a diagnosed diabetic.” But, in this case, they’re at least in the vicinity of the right place :slight_smile:

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David: Have you gotten yet the “oh–you’re cured!” when someone sees your A1c is in the normal range? Makes me want to whack them upside the head. But I try to be patient as I explain that there is no cure—just good control…

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Nope, haven’t gotten that yet, partially because I’ve been re-diagnosed as Type 1 after positive antibody tests. I do frequently get (from nurses and dietitians) the “oh, you are trying so hard to be normal, why don’t you take it easy?” treatment, which I find…irritating.

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My endo did the “you know that your A1c (5.6) is almost ‘too good’ and, if it weren’t for the fact that you don’t get any hypos, I’d say you should raise that.” treatment last visit… Uhm, I’M NOT GETTING ANY HYPOS and have an A1c basically in the “normal” range – HOW IS THAT BAD?

And yes, he’s designated me as Type 1, so he won’t give me the other junk…

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