GetInsulin.org Addresses Immediate Needs of People Struggling to Access Insulin

SAN CARLOS, Calif., Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ – A new tool for anyone in the United States struggling to access life-sustaining insulin launched today at GetInsulin.org. Created by global diabetes nonprofit organization Beyond Type 1, GetInsulin.org connects people with diabetes who take insulin to assistance programs and low-cost solutions that match their unique situation.

Insulin is a life-essential medicine for over seven million people with diabetes living in the US today. The list price is high, and not taking insulin is not an option. GetInsulin.org is an important resource for people who need help affording their insulin today.

On GetInsulin.org, users answer a few questions (such as location, insurance type, income, and type of insulin they take) then receive customized action plans to guide them through the access solutions and next steps needed. The site and plan details are available in English and Spanish, can be downloaded or emailed, with the option for follow-up reminders when life changes may happen.

GetInsulin.org is supported by a coalition of partners helping connect those in need to lower-cost insulin now, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists (ADCES), the Endocrine Society, Feeding America, JDRF, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the National Hispanic Medical Association (NHMA). GetInsulin.org is funded by Lilly, Mylan, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi.

People with diabetes in the United States face serious health complications or death when they cannot access insulin. Since 2013, the list price of insulin has skyrocketed, leaving people without health insurance or on high-deductible insurance plans paying out-of-pocket upwards of $1,000 for a one-month supply of insulin, often unaware of assistance options. This is the result of a unique drug pricing crisis going on in the United States that will require widespread healthcare reform to bring list prices down.

“Insulin is not optional for people with diabetes. The current drug pricing system that leaves many unsure of how to access their insulin needs to change, and that change will take time. Right now there are assistance options out there for many struggling to access insulin, but individuals may not know about programs or those programs may be difficult to navigate,” said Beyond Type 1 CEO Thom Scher. “GetInsulin.org is designed to address this immediate and solvable problem - to simplify the process of getting people to the right help and getting them access to insulin in the immediate term.”

Beyond Type 1 advocates for high quality, modern insulin to be available to people with diabetes regardless of employment or insurance status, across all demographics, without barriers, and at an affordable and predictable price point. Until that is achieved, GetInsulin.org will be a resource for those needing access to insulin options immediately.

“The American Diabetes Association is honored to partner with Beyond Type 1 and the coalition of organizations committed to raising awareness of GetInsulin.org, a critical tool for people who need insulin right now,” said Tracey D. Brown, CEO of the ADA. “We need to both connect people to life-saving solutions today, and work towards a system that doesn’t leave so many in need of help accessing a drug they need to stay alive.”

If you or someone you love is struggling to access insulin, go to GetInsulin.org.

About Beyond Type 1

Beyond Type 1 is a nonprofit organization changing what it means to live with diabetes. By leveraging the power of social media and technology, Beyond Type 1 empowers people to both live well today and support a better tomorrow. Through peer support programs, global campaigns, and digital platforms, Beyond Type 1 is uniting the global diabetes community across both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, helping to change what it means to live with chronic illness.

2 Likes