Needle to prevent diabetes?

Hey i heard someone talking about a new needle that prevents type 1 diabetes? Does anybody know if this is true or not?

Hi Hannah!

There are some trials when people who have recently been diagnosed with diabetes get treatments that might stop or slow down the onset of the diabetes. But these are still only experiments.

I’m not sure I understand. A needle that prevents diabetes? Could you be more specific about what you heard?

I didn’t see anything about a needle… but I googled this and found this article that came out today:

Immune toleration to prevent diabetes
Date: Friday 17th of July 2009
http://www.medlabnews.co.uk/Immune_toleration_to_prevent_diabetes.html

Drug Discovery - Scientists believe they have found a preventative therapy for Type 1 diabetes, by making the body’s killer immune cells tolerate the insulin-producing cells they would normally attack and destroy.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, where the body attacks its own insulin producing cells. It is very serious, with a sudden and dramatic onset, usually in youth. People with Type 1 diabetes must maintain an insulin-monitoring and insulin-injecting regimen for the rest of their lives.

Eliana Marino and Dr Shane Grey, from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, have demonstrated how a particular molecule may be used in future as a preventative therapy. Working with mice that spontaneously develop Type 1 diabetes, Eliana Marino found that if she blocked BAFF (a hormone that controls survival of B cells) prior to onset, none of the mice developed diabetes.

“This is a remarkable finding, as other B cell depletion methods tested elsewhere have just delayed or reduced disease incidence,” said Eliana.

When B cells were depleted, the regulators of the immune system (a subclass of T cells known as T regulatory cells) rose in numbers. By removing B cells from the picture for a while, it appears you allow T regulatory cells to function as they should, subduing killer T cells and somehow making them tolerant of the insulin producing cells.

BCMA - the molecule used by Grey and colleagues to inhibit BAFF - is already being used in clinical trials for other autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren’s Syndrome and Lupus.

Their findings are published online in the international journal Diabetes.

Wow! I wonder if that’s going to become some sort of immunization requirement some day? Maybe just for families that have T1D running in the family?

It’s an amazing research discovery! Let’s see what they can do with these findings to save our lives!

Wow.

What about families that don’t have T1 in their past like mine? I got it after my twin got the mumps, but I never had the signs or symptoms of them. 8-9 months later I was in the ER with an 800 blood sugar (1973) because family GP thought I had the flu or food poisoning. I am immune to the mumps, but have never had them in my neck glands. After asking a college professor of biology about this, he reminded me that each molecule in each body is not the same. I have thought about this for many years, but this is great for those living in Australia. Maybe we should all start saving and go there since they seem to be able to do this cool research!

Catherine

I’m the first in my entire bloodline too.

I was considering visiting the UK for a few years because they have some really great studies going on there too!