The JDRF - Beyond Type 1 Alliance Releases Recommendations for People with Diabetes During COVID-19 Pandemic

The recommendations are supported by 50 international organizations working together to curb the spread of COVID-19 and protect those most vulnerable.

NEW YORK, April 28, 2020 – Today, two of the world’s leading diabetes organizations released guidance on high-impact COVID-19 prevention recommendations for people with diabetes. The JDRF-Beyond Type 1 Alliance brought together leaders of the global diabetes community to develop recommendations to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus and to keep people safe. The suggested guidelines are endorsed by the American Diabetes Association, Harvard Medical School and The International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD) and can be found at coronavirusdiabetes.org.

Members of the diabetes community are among the most vulnerable to severe complications and death caused by the coronavirus. While not everyone with diabetes — Type 1 or Type 2 — has the same level of risk, the recommendations target broad changes in behavior from everyone in the diabetes community to protect those who are the most at risk.

“With the global outbreak of the novel coronavirus adding new challenges, fears and uncertainties, it’s critical to provide people with diabetes and their loved ones with these recommendations from some of the most trusted medical professionals in our field,” CEOs Aaron Kowalski and Thom Scher of the JDRF-Beyond Type 1 Alliance said in a joint statement. “Together, we can tap into the power of the global diabetes community to help curb the spread of COVID-19 and save lives.” Kowalski is President and CEO of JDRF and Scher is President and CEO of Beyond Type 1.

An estimated 463 million adults live with diabetes worldwide and to reach this vast community, a global digital campaign has been launched with the help of 50 partner organizations around the world.

Sharing partners include the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists (ADCES), Arogya World, Asociación DiaVida, Asociación Mexicana de Diabetes, the Brazilian Diabetes Society, Canada Pediatric Society, Carb DM, The Clinton Health Access Initiative, Children With Diabetes, The diaTribe Foundation, College Diabetes Network, Connected In Motion, CUI.D.AR Argentina, Diabète Québec, Diabetes Action Canada, Diabetes Canada, Diabetes Education & Camping Association (DECA), Diabetes Hope Foundation, Diabetes Online Community (#dedoc°), Diabetes Sports Project, Diabetes Youth Families, Deutsche Diabetes-Hilfe (diabetesDE), DiabetesSisters, Diabetes Strong, Diabetes India Youth In Action (DIYA), Endocrine Society, Federación de Asociaciones de Diabetes de Canarias, Fondation Haïtienne de Diabète et de Maladies Cardio-Vasculaires (FHADIMAC), Fondazione Italiana Diabete, Fundación Aprendiendo a Vivir con Diabetes (FUVIDA), Sant Joan de Déu - Barcelona Children’s Hospital, I Challenge Diabetes, International Diabetes Federation (IDF), International Diabetes Federation Europe, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust, Life For A Child, Maggiore Hospital, Marjorie’s Fund, Federación Mexicana de Diabetes, A.C., National Association of School Nurses (NASN), National Diabetes Volunteer Leadership Council (NDVLC), NCD Alliance, Riding On Insulin (ROI), Samatvan Centre, T1D Exchange, Taking Control Of Your Diabetes (TCOYD), The Human Trial, Tidepool, and We Are Diabetes. The website and campaign materials are now available in Spanish and English, with an ongoing goal of translation into as many languages as possible.

Along with the list of recommendations, coronavirusdiabetes.org includes a variety of other articles, downloadable graphics, videos and links to additional resources provided by JDRF, Beyond Type 1, and other partners. Organizations and companies looking to help in the effort can reach out to coronavirus@beyondtype1.org.

The JDRF-Beyond Type 1 Alliance, established in 2019, is an innovative partnership designed to amplify each organization’s strengths and provide greater support for those impacted by T1D. The Alliance combines the power of JDRF, the leading global organization funding T1D research, and Beyond Type 1, the organization with the largest online community of any diabetes nonprofit. The work of the Alliance centers around three core pillars: community programs, advocacy, and communications + education. Find more information about the Alliance here.

About JDRF

JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Our mission is to accelerate life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat T1D and its complications. To accomplish this, JDRF has invested more than $2.2 billion in research funding since our inception. We are an organization built on a grassroots model of people connecting in their local communities, collaborating regionally for efficiency and broader fundraising impact, and uniting on a national stage to pool resources, passion, and energy. We collaborate with academic institutions, policymakers, and corporate and industry partners to develop and deliver a pipeline of innovative therapies to people living with T1D. Our staff and volunteers throughout the United States and our six international affiliates are dedicated to advocacy, community engagement and our vision of a world without T1D. For more information, please visit jdrf.org or follow us on Twitter: @JDRF

About Beyond Type 1

Beyond Type 1 is a nonprofit organization changing what it means to live with diabetes. Through platforms, programs, resources, and grants, Beyond Type 1 is uniting the global diabetes community and providing solutions to improve lives today. Founded in 2015 with a focus on education, advocacy and the path to a cure for Type 1 diabetes, Beyond Type 1 has grown to also include programs for those with Type 2 diabetes. A new model of philanthropy, Beyond Type 1 aims to change what it means to live with chronic illness. For more information, visit beyondtype1.org or follow @beyondtype1 on social media.

Media Contacts:

Ayana Young, 347-496-2494, ayoung@jdrf.org

Dana Howe, press@beyondtype1.org

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Thank you, @Mila for sharing this information.

I’d like to add just a little more information about JDRF which I think might not be commonly known. The following is taken from:

https://www.jdrf.org/about/

What’s in a name? A bit of “JDRF” history
JDRF has led the search for a cure for T1D since our founding in 1970. In those days, people commonly called the disease “juvenile diabetes” because it was frequently diagnosed in, and strongly associated with, young children. Our organization began as the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. Later, to emphasize exactly how we planned to end the disease, we added a word and became the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Today, we know an equal number of children and adults are diagnosed every day—approximately 110 people per day. Thanks to better therapies—which JDRF funding has been instrumental in developing and making available—people with T1D live longer and stay healthier while they await the cure. So a few years ago, we changed our name to JDRF:

  • To remove the misconception that T1D is only a childhood disease
  • To acknowledge that nearly 85 percent of people living with the disease are over age 18
  • To reinforce our commitment to funding research that improves life for people at all ages and all stages of the disease

I am curious about the emphasis on ketones. It says we should be checking ketone in urine regardless of blood sugar. I have associated keto acidosis with an extended period of high blood sugars — has something changed? Are ketones a risk factor in getting Covid? Or are ketones a symptom of the infection?