Do you Bolus for milk?

Hey everyone, just wondering if you Bolus for a glass of full fat cow milk, the packet is in 15g carb, since it’s lactose sugar? I’m not sure

Thanks in advance Adele

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It drives my blood sugar up so far I almost have to bolus 1.5 times. Milk is a killer for me.

rick

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I’ve successfully treated hypos by gulping down 4-6 ounces of milk when no other usual remedies are at hand. This is when it dawned on me that liquids are much more effective hypo killers than solid foods. I was a slow learner.

Yes, I would bolus for the carbs in milk and also consider pre-bolus time and current BG level to time the dose well. Drinking milk combined with food would slow things down.

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All milks that come from a mammal, by design, digest very fast (I think 20 minutes is the timing). I use milk to treat lows sometimes and if I want to have a glass just because then I will bolus and wait for my BG to start dropping before I drink it.

However if you are super sensitive to insulin, like if you only need 1 unit of insulin for every 30 grams of carb, you could consider milk a freebie, but you would have to experiment on yourself to find out if you can drink milk without dosing for it.

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Wow great thanks for the information

I also bolus for coffee and milk … for me I need between 8 and 13g worth of insulin

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Milk raises my BG faster than juice or glucose tablets.

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I don’t drink milk but cheese is like candy to me! I generally need to bolus for 15g for just two bites,

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Very interesting people’s BG response to milk. I haven’t tried it yet, but T1DM athlete and author Sheri Colberg recommends whole milk and chocolate whole milk as a perfect recovery food after long endurance efforts. She writes about a 30 to 90 minute window when skeletal muscles will drink up glucose to restore glucogen, probably the liver as well.

Whole milk with fat and protein help to slow the rise of BG so that it remains a steady level for the muscles. As I said, I haven’t tried it, but Dr. Colberg has never steered me wrong yet.

I would try this as a treat, but maybe after 50 miles or so on the bike, for a runner, 10 to 15km.

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I find drinking water after glucose tablets speeds recovery faster. My nightstand has glucose tablets and a bicycle water bottle setting on it.

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I do that, too, especially when blood sugar drops below 54 (3.0). Treating this level of BG quickly reduces the amount of counter-regulatory action that can adversely affect the rebound to hyperglycemia.

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I learned that hyper rebound thing this year. I have only been on MDI for 3 months. For some reason my BG tends to drop sometime after the evening meal. I have to be careful in treating a hypo because in the early days I would over do.

The first time I did this rather than do a correction dose I dressed, put my walking shoes on and walked in the wee hours of the morning until it dropped. Scared my wife when I told her about it later. “What did you think you were doing? You could’ve been coyote bait!” Another time I got on my stationary bike, she liked that much better.

We do what we gotta do.

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I agree. I think chocolate milk is a great after run carb. This was recommended by @Eric2, too, who has helped me tremendously with controlling BGs during exercise.

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I agree about liquid helping lows better, to the extent I just never use tabs (also don’t like the texture - when hiking I bring Cliff energy gels). But beside my bed - a bunch of (mango) juice boxes, perfect for night lows for me. =)

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I bolus for everything - and 4 times a day that includes 5g worth for the milk in my tea =)

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I guess I’m unique here. I use Tandem and Dexcom and find I can eat cheeses with negligible rise in blood glucose. I usually use almond milk some varieties of which are low carb. I never see a rise from coffee with Splenda

I eat cheese pretty much every day and don’t bolus for it. It’s just actual milk that will shoot my BG up.

The carb content of cheese varies a lot, even for the same variety. I always check the labels before buying and reject any that claim >0.5g carbs per 100g. Some say they have nil carbs, others 0.1g carbs per 100g. I wonder how far to trust the labels, but still, given that I eat lots of cheese, I do feel happier restricting myself to the seemingly lower carb versions. (I am not using insulin, so I am obliged to watch my carbs very carefully.) Oddly, lactose-free cheese is not low enough in carbs for me.

I should do that too…never really thought about it… cheese is my food love.

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Lactose free dairy products do not contain any less lactose than ordinary dairy products. They simply have Lactase added to them to allow lactose intolerant people to digest the lactose. The carbs in most cheeses are negligible so what is making your BG rise is most likely the protein in the cheese rather than the carbs.

A comment Dr. Bernstein made in one of his Youtube videos has always stuck with me. I’m paraphrasing but he said that eating too much of anything will raise your BG, you could eat a handful of rocks and your BG would go up. He calls it the Chinese restaurant syndrome not meaning that Chinese food is particularly bad about raising BG but that when you go to a restaurant you often eat more than you should and even with extra insulin your BG will be more uncontrolled.