Ectopic Pregnancy

I found out I had Type 2 Diabetes in March this yr. My HB1AC was 10. I tried not to let diabetes take over my life. I exercised and with proper medication and healthy lifestyle, I managed to bring down my HB1AC to 6.1 by July. Both my gynae and endocrinologist gave us the go ahead to try for a family. We conceived and I found out that I was 1-2weeks pregnant on 25th July. I switched to insulin immediately the next day. It was real hard work, checking my sugar levels 6 times a day and ensuring that my sugar levels didnt reach beyond 7. I was in constant contact with my endocrinologist. I even briskwalked to ensure that I had some exercise per week. It was real hard work but it was worth it as I know it was for our little junior, but our happiness didnt last long. At 6weeks, for our first scan, our gynae realised its ectopic. I was wheeled into surgery immediately next day and had to have my right fallopian tube removed as docs explained that the risk of having ectopic is higher if the tube remains there. It has been a week since the surgery and I still cant believe that this has happened. I tried doing everything in a right way but yet things didnt turn out the way it was supposed to be. I was so heartbroken when I got diagnosed with diabetes at such a young age of 29 but I picked myself up and tried not to let it affect me. I hope now that the wounds will heal well but I am so afraid to try again. Will I ever be able to conceive again?

My heart goes out to you! :heart:

(I do not have D myself; my daughter does.) I had an ectopic pregnancy, so your D may not have had anything to do with it. I didn’t realize I was pregnant because we were using birth control and I had my period. I tried ignoring the pain for over 12 hours until my fiancé could no longer deal with my moaning in my sleep and dragged me to the ER. Stupid me; I had already perforated my Fallopian tube (50% mortality rate, last time I checked my old OB/GYN text). Underwent emergency unilateral salpingectomy. With only one Fallopian tube, I was able to become pregnant again without any difficulty, but miscarried at 6 weeks, likely at least partially due to my “advanced” age (42-ish). Conceived again shortly thereafter, and after 2 injections of heparin daily throughout the pregnancy, gave birth to my beloved younger daughter (the one with Type 1). Keep on trying, and my thoughts are with you! :heart:️:heart:️:heart:️

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So sorry for your loss. I am not sure what the statistics are the ectopic pregnancy does happen. I hope you will let yourself heal and try again. Nancy

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Sorry for your experience. Ectopic pregnancy is one of those things that sadly sometimes just occurs, diabetic or not. Take some time to heal from this, and if and when you feel ready try again. Maybe speak with your ob/gyn before hand. It’s been a while since I’ve done anything ob/gyn related in nursing but never hurts to speak with your doctor about any possible ways exist of minimizing risks. Good luck, and once again, sorry for your loss.

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Do you even know what you are talking about?!?!? A Fallopian tube ectopic is a life-threatening surgical emergency and no one in their right mind would not opt to have this life-saving surgery. Women routinely die after a Fallopian tube is perforated, for heaven’s sake!

Losing a Fallopian tube reduces the frequency of how often a woman can become pregnant because our ovaries tend to “take turns” releasing ovum each month, and ovum released by an ovary with no nearby Fallopian tube have about nill chance making it over to the other side to be picked up by the remaining Fallopian tube. Needless to say, many women have had healthy pregnancies and wonderful children after the loss of a Fallopian tube.

And how exactly would a uterus be traumatized during a salpingectomy unless the surgeon was an under-the-influence seeing-impaired monkey? Please think before you “talk” so the words have a better chance of coming from your mouth. Sheesh!

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@shanmohan025
You are in my thoughts and may feelings of healing and peace come to you as the days go by.
I have had diabetes for 18 years and had an ectopic pregnancy about 10 years ago. It was my first pregnancy and I too was terrified I would not be able to get pregnant again. I did get pregnant not too long after the ectopic pregnancy occurred, don’t lose hope…the pain and heartbreak may never completely go away but lessens over time.
What you have done with your health in preparation for a family is inspirational…take some time to heal, to grieve so that you can move forward with your dreams of a family!
Hugs and hugs with care,
Cynthia

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You sir (or madam) are sorely mistaken. A tubal pregnancy is a ticking time bomb waiting to rupture. I hope for the safety of any women who may be entrusted to your care that you are not an OB/GYN.

Point taken regarding the difference between frequency and probability. However, one must remember that in general, the relative frequency of an event tends to get closer to the theoretical probability of the event as we perform more trials. Based on the fact that the likelihood of becoming pregnant and maintaining pregnancy until viable birth is dependent upon an ovum not only being fertilized but the also upon the safe passage of the zygote via a Fallopian tube to settle in the uterus, it stands to reason that loss of one Fallopian tube is quite relevant and germane to the topic at hand. Stating that the probability that a pregnancy might result “is affected only by damage to the uterine wall that might have taken place during surgery” is too underinclusive of a statement to be true, if we are talking about viable pregnancy which is what the OP is discussing.

And I have no idea regarding the locations of the ORs that you allegedly frequented in which you have allegedly observed so many inept OB/GYNs, but they clearly must not be the numerous ORs in different areas of the country in which I have spent countless hours during training and practice. It’s pretty damned hard to even come in contact with the inside lining of a uterus when resecting a Fallopian tube. For the overwhelming majority of surgeons, that is…

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You conveniently continue to ignore the fact that an ovum or zygote has to make it to a Fallopian tube in the first place.

This Forum is a place where real people needing support come to, not a place to demonstrate your skill in locating and citing medical literature.

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And I never said that an ectopic always requires salpingectomy.

I have no intention of continuing this debate if you are hell-bent on splitting statistical hairs regarding the relative merits of salpingectomy versus salpingotomy. By all means, you may continue that endeavor solo if you wish. I just wish you would do it somewhere other than this Forum, and more specifically somewhere other than this thread where a Forum member who has experienced an ectopic pregnancy and subsequent devastating loss has come seeking support.

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By all means, suggesting that the OP “may have been mismanaged by current standards of care” is exactly what she was looking to hear when she came to this Forum. What are you, a malpractice attorney?

PLEASE, give it a serious rest, Twill, and take your trolling elsewhere.