How i would respond to someone who think bg is gross

as a diabetic i will not hide or be ashamed of being diabetic i bleed the same blood as you do no i do not care how gross out are you by my blood testing I do it to save my life oh wait would you like me to live a 100 years ago when we diabetics would die I think not as I am here today as a person who honors and remembers all my fellows diabetic in past present and in the future so to you I say it is your loss not to know us diabetics as we are still here and will not go away
something i wrote to stand up when people are gross out thanks it was a long day today what do you think.

2 Likes

I can’t recall anyone being grossed out if they noticed me testing my bg’s, which I’ve been doing about 17x a day (until I got a CGM) since 1979. I don’t notice if people notice me testing my bg’s. I don’t make a huge attempt to hide it, but I don’t hold my finger and meter up in the air and make a spectacle of the process either. :slight_smile: We do what we HAVE to do, WHEN we have to do it. I don’t get to wrapped up in worrying about other people when I need to test.

3 Likes

LOL, Grossed out. Shame on them. I have to admit I got over this long ago. I think my response would be to smile and keep going. The one thing I try to do is live as best as I can. I cannot help it if i have diabetes, and no it is not gross.

Best,

Rick Phillips

3 Likes

I think it’s natural for people to be grossed out by bodily fluids including blood. I am grossed out by them myself. Countless diseases can be spread (I know, not diabetes) by contact with other people’s bodily fluids… So I think it’s reasonable for people to not have to observe the blood of strangers in public. I believe the burden is on us to be discreet and respectful of cultural norms when doing what we have to do. I’m sure that position will inflame a lot of people around here, but it’s what I think

2 Likes

I’m not “inflamed”, but I disagree on every point you made. It is not MY job to tell someone “don’t look in my direction”, as I test my bg. I don’t stare at women who breast feed–why should someone deliberately stare at a diabetic who is testing their bg?? I find it ludicrous to put the onus on the diabetic. What do you expect us to do? Simply not test? Not happening…when I was on shots, I’d shoot up as discretely as possible and it was never a problem, even in a crowded restaurant. You just can’t be goofy about it, like shooting up in an obvious fashion. I used to do it below or at table level and it NEVER CAUSED A PROBLEM. Time to get over it, is my personal opinion.

FYI, this has NOTHING to do with your so called “cultural norms”. It has to do with necessities of diabetics to keep their bg’s in check. I sure as heck didn’t stay home or hide in a nasty, dark, germ-laden public restroom to do what needs to be done. I did that a couple of times, but never again. Discretely taking care of “business” in public just isn’t that difficult; nor is it traumatizing to the general public.

2 Likes

Discreetly is the key, and in a safe and clean environment, wherever one finds it.

3 Likes

Well we’ve got to do what we’ve got to do… But so do people with colostomy bags and catheters and every other medical condition that requires ongoing maintenance involving bodily fluids. I don’t think I should have to witness their maintenance of their condition, such as venting the accumulated gas in a colostomy bag, just for example. I am willing to go to what I consider reasonable lengths to extend the same courtesy to them… In public and outside of restrooms I also go to reasonable lengths to not urinate in the plane sight of others, and in most situations expect the same consideration from strangers around me… I guess I don’t see how this is too different. I just think being discreet is appropriate.

1 Like

i was saying we don’t need to hide and not let other tell us how or where to test are bg as we need to proud of how far we come with diabetes i somewhat agree with discreet but there are times when you can’t by hiding it is saying i am ashamed to be diabetic it a way to change how people are misinformed about type 1 and type 2 if you can understand where i coming from thanks

1 Like

The amount of blood I “let” out of my finger is (99% of the time) lower in volume than paper-cutting my finger or pricking my finger on a rose. So if someone’s got a problem with it, it’s not me that has the problem. And you’d really have to be breathing down my neck to see much blood, so it’s the IDEA of finger-pricking that is objectionable. Once again, not my problem.

4 Likes

How did we go from discussing testing our bg’s (which I can do without showing any blood, because I p r i c k my finger, it doesn’t bleed until I squeeze it (which I do in a DISCREET fashion) and get that tiny little drop of blood onto the test strip, to colostomy bags?. IT’S NOT LIKE I’M BLEEDING ALL OVER THE PLACE! A tiny drop of blood on the end of one’s finger is hardly synonymous with a bag of crap.

2 Likes

It’s hardly synonymous to you… Others see the world differently. I’m drawing parallels in an attempt to explain why very reasonable people can be grossed out by people checking their blood in public… In reality, blood is far more of a health risk to others, and could be considered even more “gross” in terms of its ability to spread pathogens than even a “bag of crap.” The sight of another persons blood is literally enough to make some people faint. There are reasons healthcare professionals won’t administer injections or draw blood (Neither of which send blood spraying all over the room either, so yes they are very comparable in terms of blood exposure) without wearing protective gloves, but we feel so entitled to do it in a restaurant, at the table… Point being, we don’t get to decide what’s gross to others and what’s not. We just get to decide if we are willing to take any steps to ensure that we are not grossing out the people around us, who haven’t walked a mile in our shoes. I am willing to, because I think it’s that right thing to do. You’re welcome to do whatever you want, it’s a free country… But that doesn’t mean it won’t, or shouldn’t, bother anyone around you.

2 Likes

You sure seem to take things to an extreme. I’m done.

1 Like

Lol, yeah, ok. My position is extreme when describing the reasons I chose to be courteous to others. Gotcha.

[quote=“shellyj, post:1, topic:47112, full:true”]
as a diabetic i will not hide or be ashamed of being diabetic i bleed the same blood as you do no i do not care how gross out are you by my blood testing I do it to save my life oh wait would you like me to live a 100 years ago when we diabetics would die I think not as I am here today as a person who honors and remembers all my fellows diabetic in past present and in the future so to you I say it is your loss not to know us diabetics as we are still here and will not go away
something i wrote to stand up when people are gross out thanks it was a long day today what do you think.
[/quote]I think you are right, we’re not going anywhere because in fact our numbers are increasing. But I don’t feel the need to “stand up” about any part of diabetes. I am discreet in my blood testing, certainly in the company of strangers. I kind of understand where you are coming from, but it’s an old movie and the sequels are not bringing anything new to the show.

I hope your long day ended with a good rest and a better day is on your plate now.

2 Likes

Well, I’m pretty sure I’d feel a lot more inhibited about this colostomy stuff I’m hearing about for the first time than I do about BG testing. I’ve been doing it since these devices started being available and I can remember maybe two or three times anyone has even noticed, let alone got offended by it. I think someone thought I’d cut my finger once, but they knew exactly what I was talking about when I explained. Especially in recent years with all the news reports about the T2 “epidemic” and so forth there’s a lot more awareness out there in general, not to mention the TeeVee machine has no shortage of commercials showing active happy people doing it and proudly touting their gadget’s convenience and simplicity. If I’m not going out of my way to be obvious about it I wouldn’t expect anyone to take notice, and if someone were offended I’d feel like they were working pretty hard at finding something to get in a huff about. I think “Grow up” might be an appropriate response.

1 Like

I ask people if they have issues with blood or needles before I test in public. If they are being bad about it, I just smile and test anyway :wink:

1 Like

It sounds to me like some of you here are possibly making more of a spectacle of testing your bg’s than I do. A TINY drop of blood is all that comes out of my finger (by design) and in less than 3 seconds I place it onto the end of the strip. I quickly swipe the remaining PORTION of a TINY droplet of blood (if any) across my other hand so that there is literally no visible trace of blood anywhere on me, or my surroundings.

Seems that some of you maybe want to figure out a more discreet method of testing oneself in public, IF you feel embarrassed or whatever else it is that is giving you so much angst.

I would never draw attention by asking everyone one around me if it’s OK if I test. That just makes ME the subject of curious onlookers, which I thought is the opposite of what we are trying to accomplish.

I would feel more inhibited about that too, of course… It’s just an example to illustrate the point that we don’t get to dictate what might make other people uncomfortable and squeamish any more than anyone else gets to dictate it to us… And in my opinion the appropriate way to handle all of those sorts of situations is to make a reasonable effort to either tend to your health conditions in private, or make reasonable efforts to be discreet enough not to be seen. Of course it all depends on situation. If you’re out on a fishing boat with friends nobody would have reasonable grounds to object to seeing a drop of your blood… In the same setting few would object if you dropped Trou and peed over the side right in front of them… However if we shift the example to a restaurant, where you’re getting blood on your hands and then touching the same surfaces as many other people in a place where they eat, I would consider it uncouth. It’s just basic manners to me.

I don’t so much smear blood on my hands as just rest the meter on my lap at the table and do it that way. I’ve never had anyone complain or point at me and say “Uncouth!”

But we don’t have to agree about everything. :wink:

1 Like

yes i agree about not making a big deal about testing the whole thing was how someone made a comment that it was gross more need to be done with eductateing on why we test and the types of diabetes the part that get to me is the person was a teen who should know better i am happy to be diabetic but it takes one person to make me hate my diabetes

1 Like