Is this cuz my Ping is out of warranty? or just having type 1

My numbers are crazier than usual type 1 crazy. I haven't changed anything in terms of food (I'm not a foodie so I eat the same thing just about everyday) and my activity level has been stable. I am getting highs that aren't readily explained. My Ping went out of warranty in August 2010. I am trying to get a new pump, and in the meantime trying to make do. It's been so long that I've been pumping that I really, really don't want to go back to MDI if I can avoid it. I'd appreciate some input or shared experiences from you all. I'm keeping track of the bg numbers, because that will be used as evidence that I should get a new pump. AThanks

I can sympathize with you. I have been experiencing the same thing for years. My breakfast is exactly the same every day, as is my activity after breakfast. Four hours later I can be anywhere from 45 to 250. I think that some of this can be attributed to the location of the inset (despite the fact that I only use my belly), but some of it just can't be explained. It's the nature of the disease. The only thing you can do is to take more insulin when you're high and to eat more when you're low. I don't know what I would do if I didn't have a CGM.

As Dave said I too experience the same and after 40 years of MDI and 6 years of pumping still haven't figured out with the help of all professionals how to get a balanced BG. I eat the same BF and lunch every day and my BG's can be all over the place too.
I've been explained once that it could be due to your vargus nerve losing sensitivity and causing some gastroparesis which in turn causes the body to react different to the sugars. Lots of testing or a CGM can help in adjusting insulin intake which ofcourse is easier done with a pump. Just yesterday I started with the same level in the morning ate the same BF meal and ended up with a 200 BG difference at lunch with both days sitting behind a desk. i.e. you never know how your body is going to react, hence an MD is an arts degree not a sciences degree.
Good luck

The problem is, I will bolus to correct and still no change in the bg. Only when I use a syringe to correct does the correction take effect. I would expect variability (inspite of leading a boring food/exercise life) but not by 100's of points! The pump is getting harder to punch - the buttons not responding quickly, so maybe...

This sounds like you're having a problem with the inset. Have you tried changing the locations where you have been using the insets. I've found that insulin gets in me much faster when I use my abdomen. Using my buttocks is slower. Using my thighs is slowest.

You also may want to play around with the Occlusion Sensitivity (using setup on the pump) and set it on low. You should then get a warning if the insulin is having a problem going through the tubing and getting into your body.

Finally, I would try changing the type of inset you use. You can just call Animas, and they'll provide you with free samples. Their straight insets have cannulas that come in 2 lengths - 6mm and 9 mm. You may find one or the other better in your case. I like the Inset 30s, but I understand that many people can't use them.

I always use the Ping remote to bolus. Is your remote still working?

Good luck,

THANKS. i'M PRETTY DILIGENT ABOUT USING DIFFERENT AREAS FOR THE INFUSION SETS. i'VE BEEN GIVING THE ABDOMEN A LONG REST AND USING MY BUTT. i USE THE COMFORT DETACH ON MY BUTT (i CAN'T TWIST AROUND ENOUGH TO USE THE INSET MANNUALLY ON THE BUTT). i'VE ALSO CHANGED THE INFUSION SITE RIGHT AFTER i GET AN UNEXPLAINABLE HIGH.

PS SORRY FOR THE CAPS. I RALIZED IT WAS IN CAPS AND DIDN'T WANT TO RETYPE THE WHOLE REPLY.

I am finding, after using pumps for more than 10 years, my body is not always working as well with sites. I can have extreme differences just from site to site. Some sites are very slow to absorb, while others are just extremely fast. I make adjustments to basals, or just switch out very slow sites.

Thanks for your reply, and to everyone else who replied. I have determined that the pump is malfunctioning. It is primarily on the bolus side of things. I would enter the bg and carbs, and then "air shoot" the recommended dosage from the pump. Follow that up with an injection by syringe of the same recommended dose. So now it's time to convince insurance people of the need to switch it out. I really, really don't want to go back to MDI. These recent MDI days have reminded me how hard it is to take less than 2.0 units with a syringe,

Why won't your insurance let you have a new pump? Even Medicare approves new pumps after 5 years. Yours has been out of warranty for almost three years. If your insurance won't let you replace a pump that's nearly three years out of warranty, you should call Animas and see if they can do something for you. I know they help Medicare people who have to wait 5 years to get a new pump.

Thanks. The issue is complicated by the fact that I moved to a new city and had to switch insurance companies. They want a year's worth of numbers and proof that I am "disciplined" and get an A1C every three months. I have 15 years of quarterly A1C's as well as logs from the Ice Age. I am trying to get the endo office and the pump companies to put the pressure on. I have to say that I was tempted to fly back to Southern California eevery three months to sty with the old insurance, but I think that would have been fraud and I'm not willing to go that far...

I'll take this opportunity to explain that I did the "air shots" so that the IOB function was available from the pump - something that I find very useful in pumping.

Later

I'm a little late to this conversation, but with the "air shots" does that mean you did the bolus on the pump while disconnected to discover that there was no insulin coming out? If there is indeed insulin coming out of the tubing when you bolus disconnected, then the problem isn't the pump but an issue with the infusion set or site.

What is hard to determine is (e.g. say the dose is 4u) did 4 units get delivered, or just 2, or 5u. And the problem is often enough that I don't think it's the site. I change the site as my first option to deal with the issue. The pump is 7 years old, so I am thinking that the mechanics are wearing out. It's to be e4xpected with mechanical devices. Ity's just kinda inconvenient to be trying to prove a case for a new one.

Ahhhh. I see what you mean. As far as I know, you really can't know unless the total on the pump doesn't go down, the insulin you're not getting has to be going somewhere.

I'm surprised you've waited this long to try to get a new pump. If you've decided on a new pump, I'm sure any of the pump companies would be happy to help you with the insurance part to help you get a new one. You really should think about getting someone else in your corner with your insurance company, I know how difficult they can be!

DuhMoment! I'll pay attention the the insulin total on the home screen. That is so obvious I shuould have thought of that.

I have enlisted the help of Medtronic - I'm switching for their on board CGM. I liked Dexcom and had good resu,lts with it. But Kaiser doesn';t support the CGM and the out of pocket for me with Medtronic is less than with Dexcom and staying with Animas. I have to "prove" myself worthy with the endos at Kaiser and the financial side of Kaiser.