Omnipod Pump for 7 Year Old

My 7 year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 last September and we are researching for his first pump. Can anyone speak to the size of the needle on the pod? How much does the injection hurt compared to a pin needle injection? I’ve found a lot of information on the Omnipod pump but nothing specifically addressing this question.

We currently us the BD Nano needle which is 4mm 32G. As far as I know it’s the smallest needle out there. I’m sure switching to the pump will mean a bigger stick but the trade-off is that he won’t get poked 4 x 5 times per day.

Also, if anyone would like to share their experiences good or bad with using the Omnipod pump for children I would love to hear them.

Thanks

I've been on the pump for about 2 years and can count only a handful of times the injection "hurt". It is closer to a finger prick pain for me and it only lasts a couple seconds. The clicking noise is more disturbing than the actual needle. Good luck!

Can’t speak to the needle size but the prick is like a finger stick… Every once in a while I hit a sucky site that hurts or stings, but it’s rare…Good Luck!!! I love my omni…

You never really see the needle as it goes in and then is pulled out so fast. The only thing that stays in is the plastic cannula which you can't feel.

In the worst case, it sometimes feels like someone snatched a rubber band on your body, but it is over very fast and then nothing more for 3 days. In my view it hurts less than even the nano pen needles.

I like the fact that the insertion is automatic. Other pumps sometimes have manual insertion, which I find far more painful, because I can never do it fast. (example - the manual Dexcom sensor insertion, which I despise).

As long as you pinch up, the pain is usually minimal. One time I hit a sore spot, and it was so painful I had to immediately take it off, but most of the time I barely feel it. Lacey is right, the sound is worse than the pain!

My son started on the Omnipod when he was 9 (diagnosed at 8) He's now almost 13 and we have never looked back - he LOVES the omnipod. The idea of tubing (even after trying an Animas pump for about 10 minutes) just turned him off completely so the Omnipod was the only one he really ever considered, and we let him make the choice since he was wearing it.

I asked him about the injection. His personal opinion is that sticking your finger hurts the least, then shots, then the pod. It definitely hurts the most, but it's so fast and then you are good for 2-3 days (his endo really likes him to change every 2 days but we often wait 3 . . .) And the fact that he has the freedom to eat whenever he wants, reduce basal for sports, and jump in and out of the water whenever he wants have been huge bonuses for us.

If you haven't watched the Youtube videos - check out Caleb's Omnipod videos. They encouraged us - although he is smaller and the pods are the old bigger ones. I still think they are worth watching!

Thanks for the comments everyone. Natasha, I will definitely check out the videos.

great time to consider this the smaller pods have just been released and my son notices a big difference with comfort level, even the insertion feels better, I am suspecting the new model is a better product and more reliable... I think he would do well and it is almost a year since dx for you all so hopefully you have all the basics down, did he have a big honeymoon period and is this almost over, if it is then this is good timing.... good luck what ever you decide, this is a great site for info and support. amy

He has had a long honeymoon – still going, in fact. He was diagnosed very early. It was discovered at his annual wellness visit. His A1C was only 6.1 but his BG was over 300. So I don’t think it could have been discovered any earlier.

His Endo is concern whether the Omnipod could handle his dosage since he is still at such a small dose but I did the math and think it should work. He gets 2 units of Lantus (long acting) a day so that works out to a basal rate of .083 per hour. The Omnipod can dose as little as .05. So I think it should work.

sound good, I bet you can even set a basal for 0 for a bit but we never had this issue so I am not entirely sure, best of luck, glad you all caught this early so your son did not have a traumatic experience in the hospital, Jacob was hospitalized but he really did not have much in the way of ketones and adjusted better in the beginning than later on... we were all naïve about what being type 1 really involved but overall he is a pretty happy well adjusted 14 year old who is more resilient, self aware and compassionate due to his D, hope you little guy is coping ok. amy

I started on mdi for 3 months, then switched to pumping(2 yrs ago). I tried minimed and omnipod. I found omnipod to be much more comfortable. I went thru 2 infusion sets right off the bat with minimed because the canula went thru my skin to muscle and hurt like crazy. Even when I did get one that finally worked, I tore it off after the first trial day because of discomfort.
I am fairly lean(as would be most children) and I think the pod's needle size and insertion angle is very well suited for lean people. As for the prick, you may feel it slightly more than mdi but still not painful and usually barely noticeable.

Hi Natasha!! How are you guys!?

I think we'll have to make some updated videos - 6 years later and new smaller Pod!

TexasDad, I agree with Natasha. Although my son Caleb is the one with diabetes, I have done all the insertions/sticks. The OmniPod insertion is a more significant pinch, second to DexCom in my opinion. However, it also varies. They are times when the Pod insertion is a zinger, and there are times when Caleb says it didn't hurt at all. We are not pinch-uppers. Perhaps that will help as others have stated.

I will say that when Caleb first started OmniPod, I had heard from others that it wasn't painful at all and it was likened to a fingerstick (mostly adult users at that time). That is what we were prepared for. I think perhaps on a relative basis (compared to other pump insertions) that may have been true for those other users, but to 4 year old Caleb is was not the case. So he (we) were taken by surprise when the first insertion was more significant. To me/Caleb, I think the most important thing is to know what to expect. His first insertion would have gone a lot better if he knew it was going to be more painful. The pendulum swung the other way when he started DexCom. I was so ready for it to HURT! And therefore so was Caleb. And when it wasn't as bad as he expected, he was overjoyed, even though it was quite a pinch!

Good luck!!

I understand that some injections will hurt more than others. It's that way even with the shots. I always feel really guilty when one hurts him a lot - always try to figure out what I did wrong. I just hope the very first one goes on without too much pain since that will set the tone.

We'll try to prepare him that it will probably hurt a little worse than his normal shots but then it'll be done for a few days.

Does Caleb find any location to be more or less painful than others? My son doesn't want us to go near his belly with a needle. We haven't pushed the matter too much - we just rotate between arms and legs but I'm sure he'll eventually need to get the belly into the rotation to give his arms a break.

That's good to hear Shawn. My son is very thin. When I first started giving him shots I was afraid the needle was going to go all the way to the bone! I'm not even sure the old Omnipod would have fit on his arm. It's perfect timing that they've just released the smaller one.

I would say give the "trial pod" a shot to see how it fits.

With the new one, I sometimes forget which arm I have it on...pictures do NOT do it justice IMO

I think Sam has had 2 shots in his belly and worn one pod there. He is adamantly opposed to having anything on his stomach. He wears every pod on his arms (have had a couple on his back) and we just rotate between left and right. He hasn't had any issues yet . . . He wears the dexcom regularly on the back and the pods get itchier there than on his arms.