Sugar free cake?


#1

Is it possible to make a sugar free cake? If anyone has a recipe I sure would appreciate it! If not sugar-free, than something acceptable?
Patricia


#2

The sugar is the least harmful component what are you going to do about starch? My wife made a Pavlova which is a merange with fruit if it can be made with splenda instead of sugar it would be “diabetically friendly” and it is super yummy. I will try to get my son to scan the receipy or even better if my wife can make it with splenda and it turns out ok.


#3

ooh I love Pavlova- a staple when I studied abroad in Australia! I just got some passion fruit topping from Netrition, that totally reminds me of traditional pavlova. Let me know when you post the recipe!


#4

Patricia, Saliva contains an enzyme that starts breaking down starches (flour is an example) before they even hit your stomach. So cake, bread, english muffins, bagels, corn bread, etc. will cause your blood glucose level to spike. The thing to remember is that sugar free is not necessarily diabetic friendly for a type 2 diabetic.


#5

I understand about cake, bread, etc. not being good for me. But I look at all the recipes on the Splenda website and they look good! We are having a family birthday gathering this weekend and we’re trying to come up with something diabetic-friendly for dessert. I’m thinking I’ll just take some freshly baked bran muffins and everybody will have to live with it. What about the no-sugar added ice cream, or sugar free ice cream? I haven’t looked at it in the grocery so don’t know the ingredients exactly. Probably has high fructose corn syrup in it or something like that. I’ve only been diagnosed as Type 2 for a little over a week so I’m still very much in the learning curve. Tomorrow I’m going to a Diabetes Wellness Center to meet with a Nutritionist, hopefully I’ll be better educated after that. Right now I’m pretty much scared to eat anything!


#6

I’ve never heard of Pavlova, I’ll have to look that up. I would love to have the recipe, thanks for the offer.


#7

Oh my gosh, I just looked up Pavlova, that looks yummy. Do you know if it can be made with Splenda? They actually have a video on You Tube showing somebody making one. (with sugar).


#8

The pavlova has a negligeable amount of corn starch and no flour. The issue is can it be made with splenda and maybe is splenda safe? The cream is diabetic friendly except for the calories. And so are berries. We are knee deep in Canadian income tax at the moment and our IRS will nuke us ( in Canafda you never go to jail they just take everything you own at least with jail you have a roof ) if we don’t file by 30 april but after that pavlova here we come. Any idea what would be the splenda equivalent of 1/2 cup of sugar?


#9

I think the Splenda equivalent of 1/2 cup of sugar is 1/2 cup of Splenda. They also have something called Splenda Sugar Blend which can be used for baking, but you use less. 1/4 cup of Splenda Sugar Blend equals 1/2 cup of sugar. This afternoon I did a lot of research on Pavlova and it seems you can make it with Splenda, but it won’t be as “fluffy”. I think I’m going to try it tomorrow - need to get a few things at the grocery.


#10

Yvonne is on target. Flours & grains are not our friends.

It’s not just a matter of replacing sugar with an artificial sweetener. There are great low carb recipe sites. You can use golden flaxseed meal, almond meal & coconut flour as substitutes for wheat flour. Won’t be as light, but they are healthy alternatives with lots of fiber, good for you Omega 3 fats & low carb.

Here are some sites:
Linda’s Low Carb Menus & Recipes http://genaw.com/lowcarb/index.html
The Low Carb Cafe www.lowcarbcafe.com
Low Carb Luxury http://www.lowcarbluxury.com/index.html
Simply Recipes http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/low_carb/
Low Carb Eating http://lowcarbeating.com/

Many people experience gastric distress from the sugar alcohols (manitol, sorbitol, any sweetener ending in “tol”) in sugar free candy & ice cream, so be wary. I don’t know if this is true for Type 2s, though I think it is, but some Type 1s experience BG spikes from sugar alcohols just as they do from sugar. They’re made from grains.

Don’t be surprised if your dietician at the Wellness class advocates a high carb diet. They pretty much all do & follow ADA guidelines of 45-60 grams per meal & 15-20 gram snacks. This is too high for most people with diabetes to control BG, especially for weight loss. Lower carb is the way to go.


#11

Good luck we will try also not sure that you need that much sugar in merangue. Bake it without and sprinkle a bit of powdered sugar on top for flavour.


#12

I don’t get the whole sugar-free being diabetic-friendly thing…When I take insulin for my food I don’t concentrate on the sugar content I base my insulin dose on the carb’s in the food. I think it has something to do with us checking our “blood sugar” that using that term seems to relate directly to “sugar” content in food when thats not quite the case.

As a matter of fact, a lot of so-called diabetic friendly candy etc that you find in the store is anything but! If you compare the carbs of one of those sugar-free candy’s to a regular candy the difference is sometimes so small that I’d rather just much on the regular stuff :slight_smile: To me, its not diabetic-friendly unless I can eat it without taking insulin!

Now, thats saying NOTHING about Calories…If you are trying to lose weight then cutting calories by using something like splenda would definitely help. :slight_smile:


#13

Yes, and the whole sugar-free phallacy is reinforced by what they used to call diabetes. When I was young and my grandfather got it they called it “sugar diabetes,” or just (in that near-whisper reserved for dread diseases): “He has the sugar, you know.” And as far as I remember, his “treatment” was just to refrain from actual sugar.


#14

It is called sugar disease in some slavic languages. Glucose is 1/2 of the molecule called succrose which is commonly know as sugar.


#15

Sugar is 50% glucose, starch is 100% glucose.


#16

most desserts in diabetic cookbooks have regular flour in them . Any kind of flour bothers my bg. Get a low carb cookbook and substitute almond meal for part of the flour. You can add whey powder, too. Sometimes I take low carb cereal and soak it in buttermilk and use it as a base for cakes and muffins. I then add a little whole wheat pastry flour, 5 grain mix and splenda. I put in shredded carrots, unsweet coconut and a few cherries or raisns. Sometimes I add flaxseeds instead of eggs. I take any recipes and keep substituting all the bad things.


#17

I’ve pretty much resigned myself to the fact that cake is a thing of the past for me! Last week I fixed a flourless chocolate cake. Wow, was it ever rich. I didn’t care for it much. I think I’m going to stick to the Jello and cream cheese type desserts and sugar free popsicles.


#18

Patricia Griffith, Hi! It’s possible to make a sugar free cake. I highly recommend the book “How Sweet It Is…Without the Sugar (Delicious Desserts for diabetics and Others)” by Jean C. Wade, a diabetic herself. I just received it as an early Mother’s Day present. That book contains 100 dessert recipes that contain no sugar, honey, corn syrup, or molasses. A fructose-based alternative sweetener is provided in every recipe for people who want to avoid artificial sweeteners. Notably, the recipes from the book have been served on Holland America cruise ships since 1994.

For example: Chocolate-Orange Cake contains 10.3 grams of carbs (sugars = 1.88 grams) and total fat = 1.78 grams.

Chapters include cakes and cake squares, cookies, brownies, and bars; cobblers, crisps, and pies; dessert breads, muffins, and scones; and pastries and puddings. Plus, hints, measurements, and basics.

Hope the above helps. The Chocolate-Walnut Cake Brownies recipe in the book appeals to me: 4.7 grams carbs (sugars .29 gram) Total fat 6 grams (suppose I could reduce the fat by reducing the 3/4 cup walnuts to less).


#19

Thanks for the info! I’m going to take a look at that book for sure.