Intersection question

Ok, theres this one intersection near my school that I really don’t know how to safely navigate through. I have to go straight through it, but there is a LOOOOOOONG right hand turn lane (like a quarter of a mile)

Should I stay in the straight lane even though i’ll be in the middle of the road for a pretty big stretch? The speed limit is 35 and I can get up to around 27-28 going on that section (its down hill).

Or should I stay in the right turn lane and use the pedestrian crossing?

I told my mom that I stayed in the straight lane and she went off on me O_O basically saying i’m gonna get myself killed and that I should go straight in the right turn lane.

so how should I navigate this intersection?

As a cyclist you have the “same rights” as a car. That doesn’t mean much though if a car hits you on the bike (it’s going to win). That being said, in situations like that, I ride in the “middle” lane. I would ride towards the right side of that lane so in case there were traffic they could potentially get around me, but I’d still be out of the turn lane.
If it’s a heavily traveled intersection then I might ride in the far right lane and use the crosswalk for getting across.

Ok thanks! That was what I was doing (right hand side of the straight lane)

The thing is, people around here aren’t used to seeing cyclists so they backed off instead of passing me.
I wouldn’t say its a heavily traveled intersection, but it certainly has its busy moments

thanks again!

As a cyclist you are rtequired to follow all the traffic laws just like a car is so what you were doing is correct. You can be ticketed for going straight in a right turn lane.

depends on which state you are in. In NJ, it ts the same as those who’ve responded, you could (*but wouldn’t) get ticketed to go straight in the turn lane. If you use the pedestrian crossing, you need to dismount and walk.

Hi TimmyMac-
The following is from the Colorado Rules of the Road for Cyclists, and it applies to your question. I’d be ok doing this on a 35 Mph street, but it’s not wise on a 60 Mph highway. In Colorado, the highway department often paints a transition zone in long right-turn lanes that allow a cyclist to safely stay on the shoulder until near the end of the right-turn lane at which point there is a painted designated path to move left from the shoulder to the left-side of the right turn lane before entry into the actual intersection. This works pretty well as long as you are very careful to check your left rear before entering the transition zone.
-Tom

(III) UPON APPROACHING AN INTERSECTION WHERE RIGHT TURNS ARE PERMITTED AND THERE IS A DEDICATED RIGHT-TURN LANE, A BICYCLIST MAY RIDE ON THE LEFT-HAND PORTION OF THE DEDICATED RIGHT-TURN LANE EVEN IF THE BICYCLIST DOES NOT INTEND TO TURN RIGHT.