Life of a G6 transmitter

Wondering if anyone else has had their G6 transmitter last more than 90 days? I wore my last one for 110 days. I never got any messages/warning that the transmitter’s life was coming to an end until I inserted a new sensor, which wouldn’t work and I finally got a message to replace the transmitter. (I did not restart the transmitter or do anything to extend its life.) The G5 transmitter’s battery level could be seen on the receiver. I wore those transmitters consistently for 110 days. Is anyone else not getting the warning that the transmitter will need to be replaced before it dies? Has DexCom changed something that I’m not aware of?

I just got a 30 day warning on mine. And it’s just about right on time

I also got 110 days on last G6 transmitter, and got a warning message around day 88. I also mark my calendar and make sure reorder 90 days from prior shipment.

On tandem pump or receiver or phone app, should be able to see transmitter days or status. XDrip show number of days transmitter used.

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My last one was good for 135 days. I used it until it finally said “change or else”.

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This is the first time I’m changing my G6 transmitter. I only have the Descom Receiver (not the smart phone app) and I can’t find anyway to enter the data for the new transmitter. I got the error msg saying only 2 weeks left on old battery and I continued using it for another 3-4 days. To be safe, I tried to insert a new transmitter when I changed sensors, but the device still keeps thinking it’s using the data associated with the old transmitter. I did get another msg before the session started saying the transmitter was only good for 1 more session, even though I had swapped it out and was no longer trying to use it. Is there some way to force it to use a new transmitter or do I have to restart my current sensor session and put the old transmitter in until it dies on its own? Couldn’t that happen at any time without warning?

Here is video from dexcom

You need to use a new sensor, and will have to “pair” to receiver to get it recognized.

I used a new sensor (not a restart one) and inserted the new transmitter. The receiver did not attempt to pair up to the new transmitter, but instead used the S/N and info from the old transmitter. I terminated that warm-up session assuming it would not work correctly. I then initiated another session using the already attached sensor and inserted the old transmitter into it. Now currently in the 2-hour warm-up - hopefully it works.

Did you follow steps from video. Pairing is one of the steps.

If you used old transmitter, it will likely fail when it checks transmitter days, or give warning that it is time to replace.

It seems logical to first enter trans id, but video shows you need to do sensor code first, then transmitter, then do pair.

On my first use of the G6 3+ months ago, the receiver asked for the sensor code and then asked for the transmitter S/N (if I recall correctly). I entered that and the receiver paired up with the transmitter relatively quickly. This time, the receiver did not ask for transmitter info. One thing I realize may have happened is that when I tried using the new transmitter, the old transmitter was in the same room and it’s possible the receiver still detected the old transmitter and thought it could get one more session in using it. I’m not sure, but I think I may have gotten a msg to that effect, but I’m not sure now. BTW, the 2-hour warm-up with the old transmitter worked and the G6 is now functional.

I am new to dexcom and this thread is bring up new info for me. 1). It sounds like I can use a transmitter for more than 90 days by just ignoring the warning that typically pops up at day 88? Right? I haven’t replaced a transmitter yet but am not clear on timing. Does a new transmitter always need to be paired with a new sensor? If a sensor has days left to run but the transmitter is finished do I need to ditch the sensor?

Yes. 90 days is warranty, but it can last longer, depending on how long battery depleted prior to start.

The new transmitter is paired with your receiver or phone or tandem pump. You can put new transmitter on existing sensor, but need to wait 20 minutes after stop, then put in new transmitter. Will need to remove old transmitter while sensor stays on skin if you restart sensors.

If you get past day 90, and try to use new sensor, it may work, may not depending on if it detects low battery level.

Don’t make the mistake I did:

The first transmitter when I passed 90 days, I just ASSUMED that I had to stop using it and put in a new transmitter.

So I put in a new transmitter but now the receiver is prompting me for 4-digit sensor code and not the alphanumeric transmitter code. It turns out that the old transmitter was still good for another 20 days or so. So I find some tiny screwdrivers and pry out the new transmitter from my belly (my wife thought I looked RIDIC) and put the new transmitter in.

BUT when I put in the new transmitter it started its “internal clock ticking” and I only ended up getting 70 days actual use on that one.

It was like a three stooges episode!!!

So the moral of that story is to “stop” one transmitter before inserting another one or it gets confusing for the receiver to know which one to “follow” Right?

p.s. I have used very thin guitar picks to pop out a transmitter so I could restart a sensor. They worked great.

Thanks!

MM1
October 14

PamS:

1). It sounds like I can use a transmitter for more than 90 days by just ignoring the warning that typically pops up at day 88? Right?

Yes. 90 days is warranty, but it can last longer, depending on how long battery depleted prior to start.

PamS:

Does a new transmitter always need to be paired with a new sensor?

The new transmitter is paired with your receiver or phone or tandem pump. You can put new transmitter on existing sensor, but need to wait 20 minutes after stop, then put in new transmitter. Will need to remove old transmitter while sensor stays on skin if you restart sensors.

If you get past day 90, and try to use new sensor, it may work, may not depending on if it detects low battery level.

Yes, in theory. But no command to do so.
Dexcom assumes you will end/remove current sensor, then start new. You stop the sensor.

But… it is possible to take old transmitter out of inserted sensor (leave sensor in), put in new transmitter, then do “restart” sensor after entering in new trans ID, which I think you did.

This brings to mind:

I have been using the G6 for 15 months now. So far when the battery is running down it warns me this is the end of battery life and prompts me for the new transmitter.

But consider this different case, that hasn’t happened to me yet, Say my sensor and transmitter fell off while I was in the ocean and were lost forever. But I still had the old receiver, and I had a spare new transmitter and new sensor with me. Would there be an option for me to pair a new transmitter? I don’t know where that button would be on the receiver.

There’s no need to talk to the old transmitter before pairing a new one. A dead battery transmitter can’t talk to the receiver either, so it doesn’t really matter where the transmitter physically is. You’d probably have to stop the sensor session, unless it already gave you a “failed sensor, replace now” error and stopped the session for you. Then you’d just change the transmitter ID number, like you would any other time you start a new transmitter.

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I had a weird issue with transmitters. My old one expired and I got a new one and it crapped out in a few hours. They sent a new one an it was fine on my dexcom ap but it wouldn’t talk to my pump. I deleted everything in my Bluetooth and all that.
Finally I powered down my pump and when it came back on I suddenly had data there.
No idea what happened but maybe it got confused with three transmitters in 3 days.

I have not yet replaced a transmitter but I looked at the transmitter section on the receiver and there really is NO button to shut off a transmitter. I planned to wait past the 90 days and get extra time out of it so I would be waiting for the battery to die on the transmitter. Then (I assume) the receiver will prompt me to set up a new transmitter. It would be nice to turn “OFF” an old transmitter so I can change it on my time schedule and not in the middle of a meeting or the middle of the night.

If the transmitter disappeared into the ocean per your example, I don’t know how you would pair a new transmitter

Someone who is an expert at Dexcom probably has an answer to this right?