Revved up...and high

I know being sick makes my BG go high. Eating too much carbs, too high. Forget my pill, too high. Felling very anxious, too high. But being in a really good mood, as at a party, can just your MOOD make you high? I’m beginning to think that carbs eaten at a party are of a different order than the same carbs eaten at home. The only difference I can think is that I was all revved up. And that led 176 on 35 carbs. DRAT! Anyone else notice the same thing?

I try to make note of what stressers raise my BG’s however I have not noted how celebrations may influence my BG’s. I will have to remember to check BG’s during an outing with friends. While we are on the subject I have noticed that my BG’s are lower in the morning after a few drinks the night before.

I just had a check with my CDE and my A1C was 7,1…not normal for me. We looked over my food diary, and my carbs were between 100 = 125 each of the days in the last three months…hmmm. BUT there have been many, many stressors in my life during that same 3 months…and I am the type of person that doesn’t handle stress well, if at all. We attributed my higher A1C to that fact, stress and nothing more or less. My other labs were great, very good . So I am one to believe that stress, not always food nor the lack of exercise can make our bs’s higher. So it’s lessons in handling that stress in my life for me…and much lower A1C’s and daily BS’s.

Well, I found this info on another website that helps explain the mood-high glucose connetion:

In the morning secondary to the dawn phenomenon (release of cortisol and growth hormone at night).
2) After a stressful day at work or school (release of epinephrine/norepinephrine and cortisol).
3) After an altercation with significant other, friend, teacher, supervisor, etc. (cortisol/epinephrine/norepinephrine).
4) After a severe hypoglycemic episode (results in the release of glucagon that stimulates breakdown of glycogen in the liver). The Somogyi phenomenon (rebound hyperglycemia) is an example.
5) Before a sporting event (excitement in anticipation of the big game with the release of epinephrine and norepinephrine).
6) In anxiety provoking situations such as SATs, MCATs, school exams, airplane flights (cortisol, epinephrine/norepinephrine).
7) In situations wherein medications such as prednisone (a steroid) is prescribed.
8) Etc.

picklebird where is this web site? very useful information.
thanks
Allen

I think I found the info on EverydayHealth.com but when I went back to try and find the original article, I couldn’t find it. Their stuff is buried in layers of information.