Covid-19 — An Interesting New Theory Has Emerged

A Supercomputer Analyzed Covid-19 — and an Interesting New Theory Has Emerged

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Wow. This is a very interesting article. Thank you for sharing.

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Thanks, that is interesting… And more than a little scary.

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Wow, covid-19 sounds even worse than my previous understanding :frowning:

I wonder if it acts like an ACE inhibitor if there are already solutions to the ACE inhibitors when those meds get out of control (other than the ones they mentioned in the article, none of which I’m familiar with except Vitamin D)??

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That article is getting quite a lot of play, which seems like a good thing. If it bears out, it has huge implications for treatment. Take your vitamin B, kids!

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Thanks for bringing this article to our attention, @Jim_in_Calgary. It is scary but also offers substantive suggestions for further promising scientific inquiry. I don’t know how any policy-maker can toy with the idea of embracing herd-immunity as a tactic especially after reading this analysis.

This article provides further motivation for me to continue taking my vitamin D supplement every day.

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Herd-immunity still must happen, it is the goal. Herd immunity can and should happen through vaccinations not through natural spread of the disease.

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I believe that covid 19 is spread by super computers.

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A key distinction – I heartily agree!

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I read that herd immunity through infection will likely take until around 2040. Me thinks herd immunity through vaccination is way more palatable.

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Yes, Wow. Very interesting and potentially critical information added to help with treatment.

Thanks!

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A work colleague was touting the herd immunity fallacy during a team call, and I said to him that many people would have to die for that to happen and that it was better to think about it in terms of a vaccine, that when a certain level of vaccination/immunity is reached, it protects the rest of the herd since the virus can’t be transmitted. It hits too many uninfectable people. Two days later he was devastated when his friend’s father died. I certainly was sympathetic, but…

Something I reposted a few days later on Twitter:

The full article is here:

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I find it alarming how many people insist they would not take a covid vaccine when one is approved… by some reports as many as half the population. I don’t see how with that level of cooperation vaccines will be very effective either…

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Interesting.

John

I’ve read some analysis that asserts that a successful Covid-19 vaccination threshold could be as low as 60% of a population. If true, this eases the threat that the anti-vaxxers pose to the rest of the community. I understand that this threshold varies between diseases. For example, some sources estimates this threshold at 94% for measles, a highly transmissible and contagious disease.

As a member of a wider community, I feel a responsibility to that community, especially when it comes to the health of the greater population. Unfortunately, significant slices of our current population feel no responsibility to their neighbors and are unmotivated by altruism.

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Does that 60% mean 60% that reach true immunity or 60% vaccinated with a vaccine that may only be 50% effective? I’m no expert but it seems to me like the vast majority of people would have to be vaccinated, particularly since they’re saying the vaccine may only be 60% effective…

I’m not a anti-vaxxer by any measure, but I would only trust a vaccine with enough scientific proof behind it.

Considering the pressures and rewards of delivering a vaccine, from the political (current administration’s suffering) to the economic (CEO bonuses, company profits, markets, etc.), one has to be skeptical, unless there is overwhelming support from the medical and scientific community. Even then, there could be significant harm from a nominally rushed vaccine, long-term side effects that have not been vetted, or edge cases that can result in harm or death.

Some of us can afford to wait a little longer…

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Great link / article @Terry4 :100:

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I’m with you on that @JamesIgoe

How many of you in the USA would trust a vacciine from Russia called Sputnik 5?

Here in western Canada (Calgary), I’d guess that 20 to 30% of the population are vocal anti-vaxxers (usually anti-maskers too). More amazing, I even have friends who strongly oppose both wearing masks and taking any form of vaccination :roll_eyes:.

And let’s not forget, there’s a question of how long any inferred immunity a successful vaccine will provide the population. Is there any way to achieve vaccinated herd immunity if the population needs to be re-vaccinated every 90 days or so?

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If that’s true, then the anti-vaxxers and politically motivated vaccine objectors will hold us hostage. I don’t know enough about this topic to answer your question but I will hope for the best and trust that this social experiment will reveal the answer over the next few years.

One article I read offered that the hierarchy of the vaccination order will be health care workers first followed by the elderly with comorbidities, a group that describes me. I’m with @JamesIgoe on this one; I can afford to wait a little longer, especially if I observe any undue rush to administer a vaccine that’s influenced by any political calendar.

I also accept that other non-health care essential workers make a persuasive claim to secure an early opportunity to receive the vaccine.

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