Naturopath

I’m saw a Naturopath for the first time today, and it mostly went okay. I wasn’t seeing her specifically for Diabetes, but it did come up. Something that kind of didn’t sit well with me, but I have learned to become defensive about this is when I told her I was diagnosed at age 29 she immediately said it would be extremely rare for me to get Type 1 at that age. I thought new research showed that a lot of Type 1s are diagnosed later in life, and have even been told by one doctor that more adults than children are being diagnosed with Type 1. She said something like maybe your doctor was simplifying it, calling it T1 because there are a lot of types of Diabetes that are adult onset and can require insulin. This made me feel annoyed because it’s not the first time I’ve had people tell me I can’t have Type 1, and I definitely don’t want some Naturopath writing down otherwise and potentially affecting my insurance or disability status. My Endocrinologist, GP and the ER doctor who initially diagnosed me 11 years ago say I have Type 1.

Diabetes is so expensive I would be careful. I rarely consult / listen to medical folks about diabetes who are not in the field. My primary is great about most things but when it comes to other areas I see a specialist in that area. She is great about referring me anywhere upon request.

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It’s not exactly NEW research. The whole point of changing from the old “juvenile” vs “mature” terminology was because the age association with “juvenile” was known to be erroneous. BACK IN THE 1980s! This whole “you can’t have Type One yer too old!” thing drives me nuts. THAT’S WHY they switched to calling it that. I was dx’d at age 28 in 1983, and my Dr had to write “juvenile,” even as he explained to me way back then about the coming change to “type” designations precisely because of cases like mine.

Your “naturopath” should shut up about things outside her discipline, if she has one.

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I’ll just say it - “naturopaths” are pretty quacky. I wouldn’t take advice from any of them on diabetes care. They are not truly medical physicians and do NOT follow evidence-based practice.

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I have never been to a nauropath, but I won’t judge her as a lot of primary care MDs are misdiagnosing Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults as type 2. The problem is because the classic age for type 1 is under 25 and for type 2 40. As LADA tends to occur later in life many physicians assume that high BG in people older than 25 are type 2. This is compounded in that the destruction of beta cells seems to be slower in LADA than type 1.

I have one friend who is LADA. He was originally treated as a type 2. It was when his weight was rapidly falling off while his BG was soaring that he was properly diagnosed. He is fortunate that he did not enter ketoacidosis. His is in much better health and feels so much better now.

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Thanks all. I have decided to cancel my appointment. I already am not in a good financial place, so the potential for anything to be messed up insurance wise is just terrifying and not worth the potential benefit to me. I appreciate all of your feedback and @DrBB it drives me nuts as well when people say that!! For a long time I started “lying” about my age at diagnosis (like being vague) by saying “oh, I was diagnosed close to sometime after high-school” but I would still get “Oh, that’s quite late”…urrrgggg it’s also frustrating to me that people feel it’s acceptable to ask when I got it…I know it’s not the same, but I would NEVER ask someone “oh, at what age did you get diagnosed with Cancer” or “oh, how old were you when you become an alcoholic”. I don’t mean to sound insensitive with my comparison, I just am dumbfounded with some of the insensitivities I receive.

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Is it any wonder that we people are tribal, as in birds of feather and all that. While we shouldn’t shut out everyone else it is good to have a place like TuDiabetes. God bless you jenni_bean, Stay strong and do what you know is right for you. If you can educate the ignorant that’s a plus, but don’t sweat it if it is just wasted words.

Come here and share it and we can laugh together until we have tears.

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I have great respect for my naturopathic doctor because she has a great deal of schooling, and she can also think outside of the box. When it comes to diabetes though, she greatly respects my years with the disease, so we never discuss my diabetes.
Now I am zooming with a chiropractic neurologist who is curing my statin induced neuropathy.
I also discovered brain training which cured my CFS and got me out of a wheelchair.
I feel that people who don’t take advantage of learning about different professions and ways of healing are really limiting themselves. I like to think and live outside the box.

If I consulted a doctor about my diabetes, it would be a specialist in the field.

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Thanks for sharing, @Marilyn6 I have no doubt she has a host of knowledge, but unfortunately, labels carry a lot of weight and financial consequence. If I seek out a ND in the future, I’ll leave the T1D part out of the equation. I actually didn’t really even bring it up, but as soon as it was “out” she hyper focused on it.

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I’ve consulted with two different naturopaths in the last few years and was favorably impressed with both of them. They didn’t question my diabetes diagnosis or treatment plan. In fact, I felt respect from them for the job I was doing managing my glucose.

Any person or medical professional can be ignorant. We all suffer ignorance about one thing or another. The thing that separates the wise from others is their ability to recognize their ignorance and the humility to learn new things. Intransigent adherence to “common knowledge” and myths are traps we humans can fall into.

I credit my first naturopath for helping to restore my sleep to normal patterns. I was able to get off of two sleep meds. I’ve reported the use of these two meds over the years to many traditional MDs and they didn’t object to their use.

The good/bad division of medical practitioners does not fall along naturopathic/medical doctor lines. There are good and bad MDs as well as good and bad naturopaths. We need both classes of practitioners.

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My uncle still thinks I “gave T1D to myself” because I was calorie counting and keeping them on the low side (within reason, not stupid low) before I was diagnosed. He used to burst into tears on sight of me because he thought I ruined my life. Let me tell you, planting that seed in my head did NOTHING for my self esteem. I’ve had several doctors tell me there is not truth to that, but it’s hard once you hear something and don’t know any better and self blame.

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That makes me sad to read. When bad things happen to people we love we look for reasons where there’s none. That often leaves the victim.

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I was diagnosed as Type 1 at age 57 with DKA. My brother was diagnosed at age 40 with type 1. My other brother has been type 1 for 53 years as he was diagnosed at 3

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Oh, Jenni-bean, don’t ever let other people’s ignorance of something control your life. No one would intentionally “give” themselves diabetes, and you certainly are not to blame for anything. Actually, your uncle’s thinking is @$$-backwards anyway. If you were counting calories (as millions of people do each day) and keeping the calories on the low side, your blood sugars would tend to run low rather than high. That certainly did not cause diabetes. The best you can do is to gently educate your uncle as to what diabetes is and to teach him about the involvement of the pancreas. None of us know what “causes” diabetes, probably because there may be a multitude of reasons why someone’s pancreas slows or stops producing insulin. If we knew what “caused” diabetes, we could stop the condition immediately. Wouldn’t that be wonderful! However, know that you are not alone, that you did nothing wrong, and that you can live a wonderful, fulfilling life even with diabetes. I have done so for almost 55 years now, and I don’t intend on stopping any time soon!

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Thanks for your kind words, @SherryAnn <3

No one asks for it, even with poor diets.
I mean there are plenty of 400 lb people who eat 5000 calories a day who are not diabetic.
And plenty of people who are obsessive about their diabetes control who die from it anyway.

We are just dealing with something difficult to control, I don’t see why we feel the need to blame ourselves or anyone.

Even in the diabetic universe, people can be judgemental to different types and different medications etc etc.

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I agree with Allison1.

John

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Well, I just got my A1C results…I had soooooooooo hoped for = < 7.9 but I guess that will have to be achieved next time…I got: 8.2 And I’m STILL proud of myself, because it’s moving in the right direction. I had a break-up the last 2 weeks and it’s been an emotional roller coaster and my focus on control waned a bit.

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Run away from that ignorant provider as fast as you can. As one who has had type 1 since age 35 , I can attest to the fact that many of us got it after youth. I am 73 now.

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I remember needing to see a dr prior to sinus surgery and he argued that there was no way I could be type 1 (1,5) at my age and that I didn’t know what I was talking about. Other examples, but use your instincts! You know yourself.

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