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#21

One of our members, @Melitta, has written a good deal about the misdiagnosis of people with T1D as T2D. Check out this:

There are about six antibody tests. Nothing conclusive can be inferred by only doing the GAD65 test. Melitta covers this in the above post.

Here’s another informative post by Melitta.


#22

Thanks, @Terry4, for sharing some of my tips and info on getting correctly diagnosed. More information: Dr. Anne Peters (well-respected endo and editor of The Type 1 Diabetes Sourcebook) treats all of her lean adult patients with new-onset diabetes as if they have Type 1 diabetes, whether or not they are autoantibody positive. Yes, it is important to get a correct diagnosis, but if I were in Bajahammer’s shoes, I would insist on insulin therapy.


#23

Regarding vision: I was diagnosed at A1c of 14.1. As the meds began to take affect, my glasses were useless. As my A1c improved, I got 2 new prescriptions in the first 4 monthes. It was frustrating (& expensive), but my vision has been steady since then.


#24

Just wanted to say thanks for the tips and advice. I ran across my testing, I thought maybe someone could help explain it better than endo nurse. “Doctor says the results are normal/negative for type 1”

Test
GAD 65, IA2 and Insulin Autoantibody Glutamic Acid Decaros65a
Result
<5

Test
IA-2 Antibody
Result
<0.8

Test
Insulin Autoanibody
Result
<0.4


#25

Oatmeal makes me spike like hell too. The only time I eat it these days is in the afternoon if I’m borderline hypo. I’ve never been a breakfast eater anyway…if I eat anything at all in the morning, it’s meat & cheese. :cat:


#26

Just thought I’d update everyone. First, thanks for all the links and replies. I’m learning more an more each day.

I’ve been pretty stable with a low carb diet. I wake up high (130-170), but I quickly work on getting that down into the 100 range. I’m able to hold the 100 range most of the day. I getting better at guessing the range before the finger stick. For me, I can tell by my vision. Clear we are good, fuzzy I’m high. Right now I’m taking Gipizide 5mp in the morning and before dinner. I tried the metformin, but it was too tough on my stomach.

I’ve requested a script for a Dexcom monitor, I’d like to see if I’m going low at night or if it is just the Dawn thing everyone talks about.

I’ll keep everyone posted.


#27

Just wanted reply and say thanks. I’m reading the book right now. It has answered a couple questions. All I can say at page 100 is how an the heck does he do it? Very intriguing book.

Tanks for the suggestion.


#28

Good to hear that you are making progress!


#29

Thank you. An thank you all for spending your time helping everyone.

I spent two weeks making some adjustment and some tests.

  1. I know I can’t eat bread… that’s a skyrocket.
  2. Cereal (As you mentioned is out) Tested at 80, ate retested hour later at 165
  3. If I drink an alcoholic beverage before bed… my morning BG is lower? (120’s as compared to 160’s)
  4. Still can’t figure out why I can’t sleep more than 6 hours.

#30

You’re most welcome! I’m glad that you’re finding it helpful too!


#31

‘Still can’t figure out why I can’t sleep more than 6 hours.’

I rarely sleep more than 6 hours a night either.


#32

The food shockers for me–as in I woke the NEXT day with highly elevated BGL: sukiyaki & hard cider. Will never touch either again.
The sleep issues may just be stress-related–it is stressful to learn how to thrive with diabetes.


#33

I used to never get up and now I just lay there awake after almost exactly 6 hours. I don’t have problems falling asleep, which I’m thankful for. I’m trying to get a dexcom, I want to see what happens during my sleep, do I go low and then rebound or is it just the DP that might be waking me up. One morning I tested at 3am and I was at the same range as when I fell asleep. Dozed back off and kept a alright number of 130 the next morning. I’ve had a couple mornings that I’ve been covered in sweat.


#34

It might be stress related. I’m still not convinced which type I am. 1, 2, or LADA? I want a peptide test, but my next appointment isn’t until August.


#35

About #3—I sip 3 0z of red wine before bed. I call it my Magical Thinking Sipping. I also find my morning #s are better. And I also never sleep more than 6 hours a night…Retired now, however, allows me to nap in the late afternoon! –

You’re doing great—Finding out what foods give you a spike—and eliminating those—is a very important step…If it helps, remember that, with experience, you can develop substitutes for pretty much anything you need to eliminate…


#36

When I was first dx I had a diabetes doctor, just an ordinary doctor who specialised in diabetes. He told me not to eat anything carby after 4pm. I think the idea was to keep the dawn phenomenon at bay.
Not sure if it will help you, but it might.


#37

Concerning your stomach issues. This could indicate many things, including side effects of your meds or something not related to meds or diabetes.

For me my diabetes has always caused me stomach issues (T1 since 1988) including bad stomach pain, gas from both ends, etc. These symptoms were much worse when my diabetes was out of control, and have gotten better as I’ve been able to gain much better BG control. You can also have flare ups of these symptoms when your BG is fluctuating a lot (rising and falling quickly and/or a lot).

Hopefully, if your symptoms are being caused by BG issues, they will subside when you are able to gain better control of your BG. It takes time to get a hold on it and adjust, but you can do it! :slight_smile:


#38

If I could make a small suggestion, it’s to ask for comprehensive testing, not a c-peptide test. Ideally, you should ask for fasting insulin, fasting BG, A1c, c-peptide, and all available antibody tests (should be 5). I’d even ask for Insulin Tolerance Test, and an oral Glucose Tolerance Test. Why? Because ideally, you want as much information as possible. There are so many profiles for diabetics, it’s really important to understand what is going on. Even for Type 1s and LADA (also Type 1), it’s important to know if insulin resistance is also making life difficult!

C-peptide only measures how much insulin you are producing at a certain point, but if it’s not when you have elevated BG, it won’t actually tell you much. If you aren’t taking exogenous insulin, you can directly measure serum insulin. C-peptide is primarily useful to determine how much insulin is produces endogenously compared to exogenously.

Maybe it’s because I’m a scientist, but I want all the data I can possibly get, and I have doctors that agree with this approach (thankfully). I’m in early-stage LADA and am not using insulin as part of my therapy, but I’ve found all the testing very useful in figuring out what is going on. That is how doctors were able to figure out that I wasn’t a weird Type 2 but had something else going on (first was low insulin in several subsequent tests, and then tested positive for antibodies). It hasn’t resulted in large changes in my treatment, but it does give me good reasons to continue testing and monitoring in a way that most Type 2s would not. Presumably, my beta cells will start to lose the war with my immune system, and I’ll need to use insulin at that point.


#39

David,

Thank you for the reply. I read a couple of your posts last week and thought about reaching out to you and another LADA. I think we are similar. I’m excited to hear from you.

Blockquotecomprehensive testing, not a c-peptide test. Ideally, you should ask for fasting insulin, fasting BG, A1c, c-peptide, and all available antibody tests (should be 5). I’d even ask for Insulin Tolerance Test, and an oral Glucose Tolerance Test.

This is exactly what I was looking for! I want to know as much as I can. I don’t want to waste time on something that might be counterproductive, I’m constantly making adjustments/experiments to get closer to normal.

I have a quick question if you don’t mind me asking. I know this is everyone’s choice, but have you ever tired insulin with your LADA? Not to put the cart before the horse, but I’m considering asking or taking a insulin shot (Basal) in the evening. Of course this is after asking for the tests you recommend.

My thought is that maybe it could protect the remaining beta cells, extending them for as long as I can.

One more question, if you have a second. What therapy/medicine are you using?


#40

I have not used insulin so far. I’m fully expecting to have to, and I’m fine with that, but it hasn’t really been indicated at this point. My A1c got very quickly under control with orals and dietary changes.

My thought is that maybe it could protect the remaining beta cells, extending them for as long as I can.

You’re probably right, but my benighted doctors out in the boonies of the USA don’t agree. We’ll see how that plays out over time.

One more question, if you have a second. What therapy/medicine are you using?

Currently on 2,000mg of Metformin ER and low-carb diet. I also exercise a lot (heavy weightlifting and cardio/HIIT). It mostly works OK for now, although I have times where my fasting BG is out of control, and also some times (when I’m stressed, in particular) where my postprandials are all over the place, regardless of carbs in a meal.