Stress Relief

Since I was diagnosed with type 2 in 1998 I have found that among the things that contribute to high BGs stress is at the top of the list. Not just temporary acute stress but also ongoing stress from worrying about finances, health and other personal issues. So I got myself a couple of cats, whatever better way to get unstressed than to have two furballs sitting beside you in the sofa in the evening.
However a few days ago I had another source of acute stress. I had purchased one of the new high capacity usb memory sticks from Amazon (2 terrabytes for $25) to use for backups), I could have sworn I put it right next to my laptop but it was gone and nowhere to be found.
Then yesterday my wife asked if I was missing something. She showed me the memory stick which she had found in the tip of one of her running shoes along with a couple of black olives from last Sunday;s dinner. Well I guess cats can be hoarders just like himans but I will remember to look in my shoes the next time something goes missing.

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:joy::scream_cat:

We check the cats’ water bowl! Our part-Maine Coon likes to wash toys he finds laying about.

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I get similar relief when petting my dog. I am soothed by meeting his needs for this connection as the satisfaction is mutual. I can’t imagine my dog ever hiding food; once he sniffs and considers something edible, it quickly disappears.

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I read somewhere - I think it was an article in the Boston Globe - that the ongoing pandemic has had a profound effect on animal shelters across the continent. Whereas local SPCAs used to struggle to find adoption homes for the strays and mistreated animals they were taking care of, many shelters are now empty and there are waiting lists for those waiting to adopt a dog or cat. People, especially seniors and single people, are lonely at home and in need of companionship. Hopefully they will stay bonded to their pets after the pandemic is over and life slowly returns to normal.

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Yeah. I really, really wish I could get a cat (or a small dog, but I’d feel guilty leaving them all day while I work, whenever life returns to normal). It’s one of the things I hate most about having allergies.

I didn’t know they made such large USB sticks. I will probably get one. Thanks!

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Jen,
Before I retired I would leave my cat at home for 10 or 12 hours every day and there never was a problem. They sleep a lot and as long as you are there to feed them and give them a stroke at the end of the day they are perfectly happy.
As for the memory stick I didn’t know they made them that big and still inexpensive either. Here is a link to the Canadian amazon page where I purchased it.

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To clarify, I was referring to leaving a small dog at home all day. That’s why I would prefer a cat. But as it is, I can’t have either without having constant allergic reactions even with medication. :frowning:

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My apologies Jen I thought the main reason you don’t have a pet was fear of leaving the pet alone while you work. If in fact it is your allergies that are the main barrier then that is a completely different story.

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I had a dog that used to hide my shoes. She wouldn’t chew them but she would pick them up and leave them dumped behind things. I would spend 15 minutes going around the house behind the couch, under the bed, behind another bed, upstairs, downstairs before work looking for them. Sometimes the cussing I did lol…and yet I would still kick them off at the same place when I got home.

I was so close to that dog I used to say she was a soulmate. After she had been dead a while and we picked up another doberman at a rescue, about a week after we had her all of a sudden my shoes started disappearing behind the downstairs bed constantly for about two weeks and then it suddenly just stopped and never happened again. I have always said it was a hello from my dog that had died.

We do get such joy and companionship from our furry friends.

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That sounds about right Marie.
The tragedy of it is that we will almost always outlast our pets and end up either watching them die or taking them to the vet when they are old and in pain and saying the terrible words “put down”.
I am approaching 70 and I admit I had to bury a few cats and dogs in my time. It is never fun but we knew what we were getting into when we adopted or purchased them. If we gave those pets a good life, with vetinary care, quality food, fresh water in their water bowl, daily strokes and for dogs, exercise, and for cats a clean litter box every day, we did what we can and no reason to feel sorry.

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Made me smile :blush:

Pets are a joy. I had a little black and tan wiener dog who a hoot. If he managed to get into the trash, he would “bury” his good luck all over the house. I would know because as soon as I entered a room he would immediately run to his cache and look at me like “move along, nope, nothing here”. Much to his dismay the chicken bone buried in the sofa cushions would disappear. Still miss that varmit dog. He was a Big Dog in a sassy 9 lbs chassis.

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Our rat terrier is 15 and has several illnesses, but seems to want to keep living. He eats, drinks water and takes walks even though he is in pain from arthritis. We know that we will be saying goodby sometime soon. I hate having to say goodby to a beloved pet.

My husband and I have been married 50 yrs next month and have always had pets. Now that we are both around 70 it is difficult to think about being without a pet, but we don’t want to take the chance of outliving one. We used to have a rat who would come to his name and was very affectionate. He was super smart. They have short lives, so we could always get another rat or two.

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Thank goodness you have cats to take the blame. Otherwise that’s an early sign of dementia. Just to, you know, add to your stress … :grimacing:

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After my last cat passed away it was so hard I did not want another one. We are lucky our children have pets so we share them all 3 of our kids have black labs,lol.Nancy 50

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I am also around 70 and if were to want another pet I would go to the SPCA and look at the older cats that are up for adoption. Usually their owner died before they did and they are lonely and don’t have many years left to live. But they could be a good companion for a human in the same situation. It is very hard for the SPCA to find people to adopt cats that are over 12 years old for obvious reasons but for an older person it could be the perfect match. Cats usually outlive dogs by five to ten years and our last cat before the two we have now was 23 years old when she passed away.

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I think getting an older animal is a good idea. We may go without a pet for a few years,so that we can do some traveling if traveling is ever possible again.
Our last cat lived to be 20. Wow, 23 is really long.

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That’s a great stress reliever. I’m having very high BG from stress. Another problem is I’m terribly allergic to cats. If I can get my stress inducing issues resolved I plan to get a dog. Good luck with the hoarding kitty!