Law Enforcement Success


#1

Hi there.
I’m in New England working towards becoming a police officer. I have a lot of local LEO support but am still sometimes struggling with morale due to the serious lack of positive stories surrounding T1D and LE.
Anyone in the CJ field?
I currently volunteer with a department and my diabetes doesn’t affect me at all but some days it feels like I’m going against the odds.


#2

Be more specific. CJ field? What kind of info are you seeking,?


#3

I believe he means Criminal Justice field.


#4

I am prior police officer from Florida and currently working as a Corrections Officer at a state prison. Wish you well and lots of luck!


#5

I have a story for you but it might not be what you want to hear. I’ll preface the story by saying that it was 30 plus years ago.

My husband was a police officer for 35 years (retired now). When I first met him, there was a guy on the force who had become insulin dependent as an adult and after he was already a cop. He was pretty much put on desk duty for the remainder of his career. I don’t know if that was his choice or the department’s choice to make that call, but that’s the way it went. His diabetes was too unpredictable to put him in a patrol car where he might have to do long hours, drive fast or possibly chase someone down.

Again, that was a long time ago. Type 1 management has come a long way since then. I don’t know what ever happened to that guy. My husband took a job at a different department so we lost touch.

We have known some type 2 cops but those were older guys who had put on some weight. I, too, would be curious to know of any police offers that are insulin dependent.

The good news is that there are other avenues of law enforcement that one can pursue besides being a police officer. I wish you luck in your professional pursuit.


#6

Hi! Sounds like he was pretty brittle. Currently as a unsworn volunteer I can drive the cruisers for detail construction…
But you’re right, there are tons of avenues even if being an officer doesn’t work out.


#7

A couple of relevant articles, highlighting the obstacles in the way but also how, with modern treatment, those obstacles are coming down. The second one is a bit old but demonstrates the power of persistence.



#8

These were helpful! I’ve actually looked at some of the legal documents regarding medical evaluation and Type 1 Diabetes–it’s pretty interesting! But a lot of it comes from your own ability to speak up and educate. If the medical evaluator for the department has no understanding of how T1 works, that can be a lot more difficult!


#9

@Rodulf Did you find it harder to become employed as corrections or police? My strategy so far has been to volunteer my services and get to know as many departments as I can (not hard to do in new england, everyone is pretty tight knit) so they can actually SEE that my diabetes doesn’t really stand in my way.
I show up, I direct traffic, I have a good attitude.
Sometimes it feels like that’s not enough.


#10

I did not have my current problems when I as active military/LEO. I have only since then developed this condition. I would say your current strategy of volunteering is your best bet. The stumbling block would be the Dept’s insurance not wanting to insure you for on-duty injuries. I wish you luck and hope you can find an open-minded Dept that will give you a chance.