Milk for coffee

Hi everyone
What kind of milk can I use 4 coffee?

1 Like

Cream

3 Likes

You could also use butter. Almond or coconut milk have no carbs.

Personally, I prefer to drink coffee black, but that’s me :slight_smile:

1 Like

I’ve become used to unsweetened coconut milk.

Alpro’s coconut milk has rice in it, although it contains less than 5 ml carbs per 100 ml but I have started the lchf diet so am not sure it’s approved…

I don’t know about that brand. I’ve used other brands, like Silk, which lists <1g carbs in the unsweetened varieties. I’m sure there are others that are better (with fewer or no additives) around as well.

3 Likes

I use regular cream

2 Likes

I think this is what I’ll do. Thanks everyone, you were very helpful

בתאריך 12 במרץ 2017 10:51,‏ “David” tudiabetes@discoursemail.com כתב:

David_dns https://forum.tudiabetes.org/users/david_dns Type 2
March 12

I use regular cream

1 Like

I don’t like dairy milks, so my favorite alternative milk for coffee is unsweetened cashew milk, which is increasingly easy to find and made by the major alt-milk brands. It has a much more neutral flavor profile than almond or coconut (can’t stand coconut milk in coffee personally) and the calories it does have are pretty much all from fat.

1 Like

I tend to use heavy whipping cream, when I use any at all. Negligible carbs in the small amount I use (it goes a lot further than half and half or milk). Some people don’t like how much calories are there.

If you aren’t worried about the calories and want an interesting experience, you can try the “bulletproof coffee recipe” :slight_smile:

Large cup of coffee
2 tablespoons grass-fed butter
2 tablespoons coconut oil

Blend it with a hand blender til foamy and creamy.

It has about 443 calories, but if you’re like me and can’t seem to eat enough to maintain weight, it’s not a bad way to start the morning!

2 Likes

Can you pleae elaborate on what is a grass-Fed butter?

It’s butter made from the milk of cows that graze naturally on grass rather than being fed grain and manufactured feed.

The easiest brand for me to get is Kerrygold (which is sourced from mostly grass-fed milk) or from local dairies. Just means the milk used to make the butter is from grass-fed dairy cows. It changes the fat composition (grass fed products are higher in Omega-3 as a percentage of fats) of the end product and also tastes better (at least to me). Then again, I grew up on homemade grass-fed butter, so I might just be partial to it.

Kerrygold is excellent butter, I use it in cooking all the time. I don’t know how to find out precisely what it’s made from, unfortunately.

My understanding is about 95% of the milk used in Kerrygold is from grass-fed cows. They recently changed the claim it was “100% grass-fed,” because there are times of year where some of the farmers supplement with feed. I have zero issues with this personally, although there are plenty of people online horrified by the fact that some Irish dairy farmers might supplement with GMO grains (no idea if that’s true or not).

There is a pretty good reason: The dairy region of Ireland, while fantastic for cattle (as most places in the NW of Europe are), can only support pasture-feeding on grass about 300 days a year. Grass goes dormant for a couple months during the winter, at which time you either destroy your pasture or supplement with something.

Good to know. Thanx for the background.

While I mostly drink herbal teas now and use unsweetened almond milk for various recipes, I’m with the heavy cream folks in general—including crème fraiche and English Double Devon Cream, any of which I use on my daily dose of a small number of blueberries (only fruit I can eat) with flax and anti-inflammatory spices…Lots of good suggestions here. I personally live by Dr Bernstein’s mantra: “There is no such thing as a free carb.”…But that doesn’t work for all…

Blessings…do the best you can. Experiment and TestTestTest…

3 Likes

One of the things I love about heavy cream (aside from the fact that it just plain tastes good) is that there are hardly any carbs. A win-win. :smile:

1 Like

I’ve been using Fairlife whole milk for about the last month or so and really like it. The carbs are low enough that for coffee I don’t need to bolus. It’s a nice change from almond milk.

2 Likes

I’ve been interested in this but haven’t seen it around here yet. Is it very expensive? Does it actually taste like milk?