Retinopathy


#1

Hi,
I’m wondering if anybody has been diagnosed with retinopathy?
Mild or severe
I discovered this horrible word about 3 years ago My Retinoligist said it wasn’t that bad and we caught it in time.
For about 2 years ,off and on I went for laser treatment with no real effect so he suggested injections.I have been getting injections for about a year and there was noticeable improvements in the scans,and then a week ago I had some blood affect my left eye.
There was a black squggly thing in my vision that has slowly decreased in my line of sight.

I dont understand how if its getting better its still progressing.

Has anybody had any experience with this?

my sugar levels are normal and my diet is consistent,what am I doing wrong?


#2

First things first: did you report the squiggle to your retinologist? If not, do.

It’s encouraging that the blood has cleared quickly for you. It did not for me. I had several vessels bleed, in both eyes at once, 13 years ago.

My understanding is that new blood vessels sometimes form to replace the ones that died off. The blood is from these new vessels bursting while they are still young and brittle. When new vessels begin forming, it’s called proliferative retinopathy. When new formation is NOT occurring It is non-proliferative.

Today, while I am blind in one eye, my good eye is 20/30 with my glasses on, and I am currently typing on my Kindle without them on. This is scary, but far from hopeless. Hang in there.

And perhaps most importantly, this is not you doing anything wrong. This is what this disease creates. Don’t waste time and energy blaming yourself. Just take a deep breath and take the next most appropriate steps.


#3

I agree with with the being calm thing,the worrying has raised my sugar levels.
The other day I was angry and when I tested it was inconsistently high


#4

yes stress and emotions make mine high.

I agree with Lisa - please call your retina specialist

I was treated with 11 laser surgeries about 30 years ago (combined both eyes). Mine was all in the periphery of my retinas, where your side vision is. They basically “burned out” all my peripheral vision. I haven’t had any issues since, and can still drive and read,etc.


#5

I have retinopathy that’s been treated with laser and injections. My diabetes wasn’t in great control when my retinopathy was diagnosed, but now it is, and my eyes have been pretty stable, BUT my retina specialist (who is very experienced) told me that odds are good I’ll continue to have bleeds here and there and may eventually need a victromectomy due to my age (mid-30s; older folks have thinner vitreous). My understanding is that while my current tighter control is helpful in preventing additional damage, some of this damage has already been done and may continue to play out even if my control remains good. For now though, we are controlling my eye that has a tendency toward hemorrhages with Avastin every 4-6 months, which seems to be holding things at bay. Sometimes when I have a bad cough or if I vomit, I get a bleed, but it clears eventually. As long as it keeps clearing well and I continue to have no signs of detachment or anything else, my doctor says we can keep continuing as we are. If the bleeds speed up in frequency and stop being controlled adequately by the injections, we will have to reconsider. I’m hoping this phase lasts a long time, and it’s a major motivator for me in maintaining good control and continuing to tighten it as much as possible.

Also, my understanding is that most of us, even those of us with “good” control, still don’t look like non-diabetics blood sugar-wise (I know there are some exceptions on here), and it adds up. So you might be doing nothing wrong and still have some problems.


#6

I guess it is what it is and all I can do is hope for the best.
Life has a way of operating upon its own accord despite our best attempts at responsibility and or control.

It’s just life,You can be doing good and just living and then something like this happens and you remember,“oh yeah!” I have this disease and you feel small and fragile as a result.
Your faced with the truth of your condition èven though you struggle to be like everyone else.


#7

and retinopathy is really common if you’ve had diabetes for > 20 years…


#8

My retinoligist said it’s not proliferative,he said sometimes it just happens.
From my research I know he’s right
Sometimes it takes years to go into regression and sometimes it gets better and sometimes it gets worse.

Does anybody have experience with leakage?
Does it go away or does your vision remain cloudy as a result of the blood?
It was just a little bit


#9

The blood should clear eventually, but people vary in how long that takes. It cleared up substantially quickly for me, but I had little bits of blood left in my vision for many months, and those usually settle to the bottom of the eye but can get shaken up on occasion. They look different than new bleeds, which are initially (for me anyway) a much sharper line (old ones are little blurry bits) that then becomes total cloudiness.


#10

Þhe dark blood has almost cleared except for a small squiggle
It’s more of a a haze obscuring my vision
Alot like vexing the world through smoky scratched glass
Thanks for your reply


#11

have you had vitrectomy done? this is where remove gel from and replace with a liquid. i have had this done to both of my eyes.


#12

How long ago and how is your vision afterwards?


#13

Before the surgery when 17 weeks not being able to out one eye.It was 4 years ago. I did have few shots in the eye after surgery I took about year for some of small gel floater pieces to go ago. My was much improved. For last 2 years I have problems keeping my A1c low after my would pay for my victoza. I have a few shots lately to stop small bleeds. Normally a week after the shot my is clear of blood and I can see again.my eyes were really bad when started treatment. I have had 5 laser surgeries on each eye plus 16 shots on each eye. Are you seeing retina specialist ?


#14

I saw you post from another subject about your A1c. I suggest that wait until your A1c is lower. The reason high A1c will cause the back of your eye to swell which causes your vision to be blurred.it take 6 to 8 months after your A1c at the right level before your eyes will improve.I am type 2 diabetic.i know things are different type 1 diabetic compared to type2. The bottom line is high sugar levels will destroy your eyes, kidney,nerves and your heart.


#15

I just had another test and it was 8.0 instead of 8.6
Not much of an improvement.
What do you mean wait? Treatment?
It’s been ongoing for 3 years now